Today is 7-11-2013 July 11th is the day 7-Eleven stores give away FREE SLURPEES

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Type Subsidiary
Industry Retail (convenience   stores)
Founded 1927 (1927)
Headquarters Dallas, Texas
Number of locations 50,254
Key people Joseph DePinto, CEO
Products Slurpee beverage
Big Gulp beverage Cup
Other products include: coffee, sandwiches, prepared foods, gasoline, dairy   products, various beverages
Revenue                                                                       $16.681 billion (Estimated) US$ (2009)[1]
Employees 45,000 (2010 NA)
Parent Seven & I Holdings Co. Ltd.
Website 7-eleven.com
7andi.com
sej.co.jp

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Slurpee history

Machines to make frozen beverages were invented by Omar Knedlik in the late 1950s. The idea for a slushed ice drink came when Knedlik’s soda fountain broke down, forcing him to put his sodas in a freezer to stay cool, which caused them to become slushy. Many people loved them, which gave him the idea to make a machine to help make a “slushy”. When it became popular, Knedlik hired artist Ruth E. Taylor to create a name and logo for his invention. She created the ICEE name and designed the original logo, which is used today. Early prototypes for the machine made use of an automobile air conditioning unit.[2] In 1965, 7-Eleven began a licensing deal with The ICEE Company to sell the product under certain conditions. Two of these were that 7-Eleven must use a different name for the product, and that the company was only allowed to sell the product in 7-Eleven locations in the US, a non-compete clause ensuring the two drinks never went head to head for distribution rights. 7-Eleven then sold the product that in 1967 became known as the “Slurpee” (for the sound made when drinking them). The term was coined by Bob Stanford, a 7-Eleven agency director.

The Slurpee machine has a separate spout for each flavor at the front of a tumbler or freezer, where patrons pour their own Slurpees. When Slurpees were first introduced, the dispensing machine was located behind the counter, and the clerk was tasked with dispensing the product. Common flavors are frozen Coke, Mountain Dew, and cherry, but new flavors are introduced regularly. In the Slurpee’s early history, flavors rotated much more frequently than today.

A dual-chambered Slurpee cup was announced for June 2011 release which uses a double straw and switchable valve to allow consumers to drink either of the flavors alone or both flavors simultaneously.[3]

History of 7-Eleven

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A variation of the 7-Eleven logo with a lighter shade of green.

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One Arts Plaza, which houses the U.S. headquarters of 7-Eleven

The company has its origins in 1927 in Dallas, Texas, when an employee of Southland Ice Company, John Jefferson Green, started selling milk, eggs and bread from an improvised storefront in one of the company’s ice houses.[7] Although small grocery stores and general merchandisers were present in the immediate area, Joe C. ‘Jodie’ Thompson, Jr., the manager of the ice plant, discovered selling convenience items, such as bread and milk, was popular due to the ice’s ability to preserve the items. This significantly cut back on the need to travel long distances to the grocery stores for basic items. Thompson eventually bought the Southland Ice Company and turned it into Southland Corporation, which oversaw several locations which opened in the Dallas area.[6]

By 1928, a manager of one of these locations brought back a totem pole from Alaska and placed it in front of his store. Due to the attention received by the totem pole, additional totem poles were placed at each of the locations and all the stores began operating under the name “Tot’em Stores” (a word play on the totem poles as well as the idea that customers toted away their purchases).[6][7] In that same year many of the locations also began selling gasoline. Although the Great Depression caused the company to go bankrupt in 1931, it still managed to continue operations.

In 1946, in an effort to continue the company’s post war recovery, the name of the stores was changed to 7-Eleven to reflect their hours of operation—7 am to 11 pm, which at the time was unprecedented. By 1952, 7-Eleven opened its 100th store. It was incorporated as Southland Corporation in 1961.[7] In 1962, 7-Eleven first experimented with a 24-hour schedule in Austin, Texas after an Austin store was forced to remain open all night due to customer demand following a University of Texas football game.[6] By 1963, 24-hour stores were established in Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas as well as Las Vegas, Nevada.[8]

In the 1980s, the company encountered financial difficulty, selling off its ice division, and was rescued from bankruptcy by Ito-Yokado, its largest franchisee. This also resulted in several metropolitan areas losing 7-Eleven stores to rival convenience store operators. In 1987, John Philp Thompson, the CEO of 7-Eleven, completed a $5.2 billion management buyout of the company his father had founded.[9] The buyout suffered from the 1987 stock market crash and after failing initially to raise high yield debt financing, the company was required to offer a portion of the company’s stock as an inducement to invest in the company’s bonds.[10][11]

The Japanese company gained a controlling share of 7-Eleven in 1991,[6] during the Japanese asset bubble of the early 1990s. Ito-Yokado formed Seven & I Holdings Co. and 7-Eleven became its subsidiary in 2005. In 2007, Seven & I Holdings announced it would be expanding their American operations, with an additional 1,000 7-Eleven stores in the United States.
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From 1970-Very Groovy
Here is “Dance the Slurp”

On this day in 1804 Aaron Burr shot and killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel in New York

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Read about it here

Remember to call Coach Billy at 248-569-7283 for all of your home mortgage needs

-HARP 2.0 refinances

-FHA streamline refinances

-VA refinances

-Conventional, VA and FHA purchases

-Pre approvals

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

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Fifty Years ago

Berlin marks 50 years of JFK’s famous speech

Associated Press

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Berlin — Berlin is celebrating the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s famed “Ich bin ein Berliner” speech — a pledge of support to the divided city on the Cold War’s front line that still resonates in a much-changed world.

Kennedy made his speech during a several-hour trip to West Berlin on June 26, 1963 — nearly two years after communist East Germany cut the city in half by building the Berlin Wall and amid concern that America might abandon the Cold War outpost.

Egon Bahr, then an aide to West Berlin’s mayor, recalled at a ceremony Wednesday that the Kennedy’s “I am a Berliner” declaration received “explosive applause” because it bolstered Berliners’ hopes. He said: “They knew instinctively, ‘we can feel safe after this sentence.’”

 

Two years after the construction of the Berlin Wall, President Kennedy paid a historic visit to Berlin to challenge Soviet oppression and offer hope to the people of the divided city.

At the end of World War II, the main Allied powers—the United States, France, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union—divided Germany into two zones.

The Soviet Union occupied East Germany and installed a rigidly controlled communist state. The other three Allies shared the occupation of West Germany and helped rebuild the country as a capitalist democracy. The City of Berlin, located 200 miles inside East Germany, was also divided. Half of the city—West Berlin—was actually part of West Germany.

Many East Germans did not want to live in a communist country and crossed into West Berlin, where they could either settle or find transportation to West Germany and beyond. By 1961, four million East Germans had moved west. This exodus illustrated East Germans’ dissatisfaction with their way of life, and posed an economic threat as well, since East Germany was losing its workers.

A Summit with the Soviets

In June 1961, President John F. Kennedy traveled to Vienna, Austria, for a summit with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. Not only was the summit unsuccessful in its goal of building trust, but it also increased tensions between the two superpowers—particularly in discussions regarding the divided city of Berlin.

During the summit, Khrushchev threatened to cut off Allied access to West Berlin. Kennedy was startled by Khrushchev’s combative style and tone and unsettled by the threat. In an address to the American people on July 25, President Kennedy announced that the United States might need to defend its rights in Berlin militarily:

“So long as the communists insist that they are preparing to end by themselves unilaterally our rights in West Berlin and our commitments to its people, we must be prepared to defend those rights and those commitments. We will at times be ready to talk, if talk will help. But we must also be ready to resist with force, if force is used upon us. Either alone would fail. Together, they can serve the cause of freedom and peace.”

President Kennedy ordered substantial increases in American intercontinental ballistic missile forces, added five new army divisions, and increased the nation’s air power and military reserves.

The Berlin Wall

In the early morning hours of August 13, 1961, the people of East Berlin were awakened by the rumbling of heavy machinery barreling down their streets toward the line that divided the eastern and western parts of the city.

Groggy citizens looked on as work details began digging holes and jackhammering sidewalks, clearing the way for the barbed wire that would eventually be strung across the dividing line. Armed troops manned the crossing points between the two sides and, by morning, a ring of Soviet troops surrounded the city. Overnight, the freedom to pass between the two sections of Berlin ended.

Running across cemeteries and along canals, zigzagging through the city streets, the Berlin Wall was a chilling symbol of the Iron Curtain that divided all of Europe between communism and democracy. Berlin was at the heart of the Cold War.

In 1962, the Soviets and East Germans added a second barrier, about 100 yards behind the original wall, creating a tightly policed no man’s land between the walls. After the wall went up, more than 260 people died attempting to flee to the West.

Though Kennedy chose not to challenge directly the Soviet Union’s building of the Berlin Wall, he reluctantly resumed testing nuclear weapons in early 1962, following the lead of the Soviet Union.

 

“Let Them Come to Berlin’

In the summer of 1963, President Kennedy visited Berlin and was greeted by ecstatic crowds who showered his entourage with flowers, rice, and torn paper. In the Rudolph Wilde Platz, Kennedy gave one of his most memorable speeches to a rapt audience: “There are many people in the world who really don’t understand, or say they don’t, what is the great issue between the free world and the Communist world. Let them come to Berlin. There are some who say that communism is the wave of the future. Let them come to Berlin. And there are some who say in Europe and elsewhere we can work with the Communists. Let them come to Berlin. And there are even a few who say that it is true that communism is an evil system, but it permits us to make economic progress. Lass’sie nach Berlin kommen. Let them come to Berlin.”

No other American politician had met with such joy and enthusiasm on a visit to Germany. Shortly after President Kennedy’s death in November of 1963, the square where he had made his famous speech was renamed the John F. Kennedy Platz.

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A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

FLAG DAY 2014

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Poster commemorating the 140th Flag Day on June 14, 1917

Observed by United States
Date June 14

Today June 14 2013 is the 236th celebration of Flag Day.
It is the 234th birthday of The U.S. Army

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Betsy Ross’s House

Forgotten cool songs…
Here are two great examples of some terrific Blue Eyed Soul

Hall & Oates
Missed opportunity

Back together again

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Been a while…

Hard to believe that 45 years has passed since the murders of MLK and RFK.

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The summer of 1968 was one of both tragedy & joy (1968 Detroit Tigers)

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The Tigers’ role in healing a city

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The 1968 baseball season occurred in a year of upheaval. The Tet Offensive earlier in the year increased opposition to the Vietnam War. The City of Detroit had suffered through one of the worst riots in American history during the summer of 1967. Less than a week before Opening Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, triggering civil unrest in 60 American cities. The assassination of Robert Kennedy followed in June. And in late August, the Tigers played a series in Chicago, as Chicago police had violent confrontations with thousands of anti-war protesters during the Democratic National Convention. Yet, through the summer of 1968, the people of Detroit were united by their passion for the Tigers and the calming radio voice of Tigers broadcaster, Ernie Harwell. When the Tigers won the World Series, the headline in the Detroit Free Press read: “WE WIN!” The headline told the story. Amidst all the turmoil, the people of Detroit came together behind their baseball team.

 

                       

Tigers Win the Series

In a column published on October 11, 1968, Detroit’s senior baseball writer, Joe Falls, described the impact of the Tigers championship on the city.

My
town, as you know, had the worst riot in our nation’s history in the summer of
1967, and it left scars which may never fully heal. . . . And so, as 1968
dawned and we all started thinking ahead to the hot summer nights in Detroit,
the mood of our city was taut. It was apprehensive. . . . But then something
started happening in the middle of 1968. You could pull up to a light at the
corner of Clairmount and 12th, which was the hub of last year’s riot, and the
guy in the next car would have his radio turned up: ‘ …. McLain looks in for
the sign, he’s set — here’s the pitch’ … It was a year when an entire
community, an entire city, was caught up in a wild, wonderful frenzy.

Even the Governor of Michigan, George Romney, credited the Tigers with helping calm the city. In a letter to owner John Fetzer, Romney wrote: “The deepest meaning of this victory extends beyond the sports pages, radio broadcasts, and the telecasts that have consumed our attention for several months. This championship occurred when all of us in Detroit and Michigan needed a great lift. At a time of unusual tensions, when many good men lost their perspective toward others, the Tigers set an example of what human relations should really be.”[

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Otis Redding

Mason Williams

Joes Feliciano Summer 1968

Jose Feliciano at World Series of 1968

Herb Alpert

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Joe Namath was a superstar

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Read more here

When this is the title of your autobiography is

I can’t wait until tomorrow; cause I get better looking every day”

You must have swag!

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Daily News; Frontpage; Headline; 1/13/97

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A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

52 years ago this week…JFK was inaugurated our 35th President…

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At the Orange Bowl greeting veterans of Bay of Pigs invasion

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John F. Kennedy

On November 22, 1963, when he was hardly past his first thousand days in office, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was killed by an assassin’s bullets as his motorcade wound through Dallas, Texas. Kennedy was the youngest man elected President; he was the youngest to die.

Of Irish descent, he was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, on May 29, 1917. Graduating from Harvard in 1940, he entered the Navy. In 1943, when his PT boat was rammed and sunk by a Japanese destroyer, Kennedy, despite grave injuries, led the survivors through perilous waters to safety.

Back from the war, he became a Democratic Congressman from the Boston area, advancing in 1953 to the Senate. He married Jacqueline Bouvier on September 12, 1953. In 1955, while recuperating from a back operation, he wrote Profiles in Courage, which won the Pulitzer Prize in history.

In 1956 Kennedy almost gained the Democratic nomination for Vice President, and four years later was a first-ballot nominee for President. Millions watched his television debates with the Republican candidate, Richard M. Nixon. Winning by a narrow margin in the popular vote, Kennedy became the first Roman Catholic President.

His Inaugural Address offered the memorable injunction: “Ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.” As President, he set out to redeem his campaign pledge to get America moving again. His economic programs launched the country on its longest sustained expansion since World War II; before his death, he laid plans for a massive assault on persisting pockets of privation and poverty.

Responding to ever more urgent demands, he took vigorous action in the cause of equal rights, calling for new civil rights legislation. His vision of America extended to the quality of the national culture and the central role of the arts in a vital society.

He wished America to resume its old mission as the first nation dedicated to the revolution of human rights. With the Alliance for Progress and the Peace Corps, he brought American idealism to the aid of developing nations. But the hard reality of the Communist challenge remained.

Shortly after his inauguration, Kennedy permitted a band of Cuban exiles, already armed and trained, to invade their homeland. The attempt to overthrow the regime of Fidel Castro was a failure. Soon thereafter, the Soviet Union renewed its campaign against West Berlin. Kennedy replied by reinforcing the Berlin garrison and increasing the Nation’s military strength, including new efforts in outer space. Confronted by this reaction, Moscow, after the erection of the Berlin Wall, relaxed its pressure in central Europe.

Instead, the Russians now sought to install nuclear missiles in Cuba. When this was discovered by air reconnaissance in October 1962, Kennedy imposed a quarantine on all offensive weapons bound for Cuba. While the world trembled on the brink of nuclear war, the Russians backed down and agreed to take the missiles away. The American response to the Cuban crisis evidently persuaded Moscow of the futility of nuclear blackmail.

Kennedy now contended that both sides had a vital interest in stopping the spread of nuclear weapons and slowing the arms race–a contention which led to the test ban treaty of 1963. The months after the Cuban crisis showed significant progress toward his goal of “a world of law and free choice, banishing the world of war and coercion.” His administration thus saw the beginning of new hope for both the equal rights of Americans and the peace of the world.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Michael Beschloss and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2009 by the White House Historical Association.

 

 

Here is a great gallery of photos the WERE NOT published in LIFE Magazine

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“Portrait of President John F. Kennedy” by Elaine de Kooning, December 1962

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

MERRY CHRISTMAS to Everyone!

The best and last Game Plan of 2012!

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Most rock fans assume that all Christmas music is terrible. They’re mostly right, but every once in a while a Christmas miracle happens — and a great holiday song gets produced. Some of the best examples come from 1963’s Phil Spector’s Christmas Album. It had the horrible fate of coming out the exact day that John F. Kennedy was assassinated, so very few people were looking to sing along to “Frosty The Snowman” — but they missed out on a Wall of Sound masterpiece that’s one of Spector’s most satisfying LP’s. Here’s a look and listen at 15 of the greatest Christmas songs ever.

Read more: Here

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The Temptations…Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer

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Santa Claus conquers the Martians from 1964

Santa Claus appears on Batman…I love the 60’s!

Rudolph the rednosed reindeer…

Wham…Last Christmas

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Bard Graduate Center/Yale University Press Santa Claus, 1912

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Bard Graduate Center/Yale University Press Sailboats, 1945
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Bard Graduate Center/Yale University Press Village, 1955

I Love Lucy…Color Christmas episode

Part 1.

Part 2.

Bewitched “Santa comes to visit and stays…Part 1.

Part 2.

Bing Crosby & David Bowie sing a Christmas Classic together

Johnny Cash…I’ll be home for Christmas

Bob Seger…Little Drummer Boy

Band Aid, “Do They Know It’s Christmas”

In 1984 Bob Geldof and Midge Ure had much of British rock elite come together to record a Christmas song to aid famine relief in Ethiopia. The one-time-only supergroup was comprised of Bono, Phil Collins, Boy George, Sting, George Michael and many others. The song was a massive hit and gave birth to Live Aid the next year, though 20 years later people are still puzzling over Bono’s line, “Tonight thank God it’s them instead of you.”

Here is the extended version where the artists introduce themselves…GREAT!

Prince…Another lonely Christmas

Jimi Hendrix…Little Drummer Boy

Otis Redding…Merry Christmas Baby

Charlie Brown…Please come home for Christmas

B.B. King…Back Door Santa

The Platters…White Christmas…Clyde McPhatter’s voice is spectacular

The Iceman Jerry Butler sings a different I’ll be home for Christmas

Ramsey Lewis Trio…The Christmas Blues

The Brady Bunch before they became old disturbing adolescents…The Voice of Christmas episode

Dick Van Dyke show…Christmas episode clip

The Lucy show from 1965…

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John Coltrane
“My Favorite Things”

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20121221-20Children watch the toy assembly line at Santa’s Workshop in the Ford Rotunda, in Dearborn, Michigan.

20121221-21Holiday shoppers crowd the streets of downtown Detroit in 1957.

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20121221-23Lines of people wait in the Ford Rotunda for their chance to visit with Santa and tell him exactly what they want!

20121221-24A Christmas candy cane bus takes passengers around downtown Detroit in 1958.

It isn’t Christmas without the Budweiser Clydesdales…

Norelco Santa!

Miller Beer Christmas…

Coca Cola…

Carmen Macrae and Sammy Davis Jr.
Baby its cold outside

See you all January 7th 2013!

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL

RIP John Lennon (there is a connection)

20121210-1

20121210-2

Howard Cosell  August 8, 1983 X 28760 credit:  Arnold Newman - assign

20121210-4

20121210-5

20121210-6

20121210-7

1970s Memories

1970

20121210-8

20121210-9

20121210-10

John Lennon on MNF…

Howard Cosell tells the world that John Lennon is gone…

Turn out the lights…

Here is a great column by The Sports Guy-Bill Simmons

Hank Williams Jr.

Epic Early 70’s TV Commercials

John Lennon
Mind Games

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

71st anniversary of – “A date which will live in infamy”

Pearl Harbor Day…Pearl Harbor attack brought us together in a way we seem to have forgotten

20121207-1

20121207-2

20121207-3
FDR’s Speech…

20121207-4

20121207-5

20121207-6

20121207-7

Pearl Harbor attack

When unity was All American

Some survivors remember

20121207-9

20121207-10

20121207-11

20121207-12

20121207-13

20121207-14

20121207-15

Seventy years ago Dec. 7, the nation was shocked by the news from Pearl Harbor, a place many Americans had never heard of before. They had been assured by aviation hero Charles Lindbergh, a leader of the isolationist, anti-war movement, that “the Japanese had such bad eyesight that they could not fly aircraft effectively.”

Yet without declaring war, Japan had launched a massive air attack on the ill-prepared U.S. naval forces in Hawaii. The damage — 2,402 Americans killed, four battleships sunk, 188 aircraft destroyed — wouldn’t be known publicly for weeks.

Christmas Time TV show schedule 2012

December 24th 1941 Christmas Tree lighting ceremony at The White House

Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor

20121207-17

20121207-18

Christmas with Camel Cigarettes…

Santa Claus on film 1898!…

Ronnie Spector and Darlene Love sign a Christmas song medley…very cool

The Ronettes…Sleigh Ride…

20121207-19

20121207-20

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

RIP Sonny Eliot

Eliot seen in July 1979 outside of The Detroit News. Detroit News Photo Archive

Marvin “Sonny” Eliot was the pilot of a B-24 that was shot down during a bombing mission over Germany during the war and he was captured. He spent 18 months in the Stalagluft I prison camp.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121116/METRO/211160390#ixzz2COwCC59X

 

“The bell has ‘ring-a-ding-a-dined'” for legendary weatherman Sonny Eliot.

The wacky broadcaster — who became an icon during a 63-year career on Detroit television and radio — was 91.

According to WWJ-AM (950) — the radio station he called home for decades, from 1947 to 2010 — Eliot died at his Farmington Hills home with family by his side. His family made the announcement Friday morning.

For six decades, Eliot delighted listeners — and TV viewers on the Evening News Association’s WWJ-TV, now WDIV-TV — with an unrelenting barrage of quips, funny noises, unusual city names and groaners.

More borscht-belt comedian than meteorologist, he delighted in coining new words (rainy, foggy conditions were “froggy”) and giving the weather in far-flung locales whose names he willfully mispronounced.

His broadcasts were a collection of accents, funny noises, cornball humor and analogies from Mars. Somewhere in there was the forecast.

He went on long tangents unrelated to the weather and lapsed into a foreign language when telling the temperature in that country.

Whatever it took to get a chuckle.

“Sonny just oozed personality,” said Matt Friedman, a Farmington Hills marketing executive who had worked with Eliot at WWJ. “He was the same in person as he was on the radio. He was hysterical.”

Long before Doppler radar and blow-dried anchors, TV news in Detroit was populated by outsized characters such as Eliot.

He loved to combine words, scribbling his inventions on the weatherboard. Snow and fog were “snog.” Sunny and mild were “smild.”

Then there were his goofy expressions.

A lousy day was as pleasant as diaper rash. A town was so small it would take two to make a colon. Never put off until tomorrow what you can ignore altogether.

And there were those favorite bits telling the temperature in distant countries, in the native language.

Eliot would get the actual temperature in Buenos Aires from the wire services on the air and then say “It’s 85 degrees, ochenta y cinco, in Buenos Aires,” in flawless Spanish.

“It’s all about research, robbery and stealth,” he once said about his broadcasts.

Eliot’s early years

Born Marvin Eliot Schlossberg in Detroit in 1920, Eliot grew up on Hastings Street, the youngest child of Latvian immigrants Jacob and Jeanette Schlossberg, who owned a hardware store in Detroit.

The year of his birth was always a matter of conjecture because he was forever shaving years off his age.

Eliot wanted to be an actor, which didn’t surprise anyone aware of his hambone.

While attending Wayne State University, he had small roles in school and professional plays and on national radio programs made in Detroit, such as “The Lone Ranger” and “The Green Hornet.”

He even acted in a German POW camp.

He was the pilot of a B-24 bomber nicknamed Doodley Squat that was shot down over Germany during World War II.

It was poor planning to be captured by the folks you just bombed, he later joked.

During 14 months at Stalag Luft I, he wrote and acted in skits and musicals to entertain the other prisoners.

“I worked up some comedy to entertain the guys,” he said in a 1980 interview. “How could I miss? I had a captive audience.”

A weatherman is born

After returning from the war, he tried to make it on Broadway but failed.

Meanwhile, in 1946, a new medium had arrived in Detroit. WWJ-TV became the first TV station in Michigan.

Eliot got a bit part on a children’s TV show involving puppets, “Let’s See Willy Dooit.”

He was willing to do just about anything to expand his presence on TV, pleading with bosses, auditioning for various roles, taking whatever was offered.

When the TV station was looking for a weatherman in 1956, Eliot jumped at it.

He had little knowledge of meteorology. What he did have was a love of English and shtick.

“Meteorology is just two weeks behind a farmer with arthritis,” he said years later.

During the first three months, his broadcasts were straight, dry recitations of temperatures and weather conditions.

One day, he told TV viewers that it was 55 degrees in Las Vegas.

“Ten the hard way,” someone said off camera, using the craps term.

Crew members laughed. The boss didn’t get mad. And a career was born.

After that, Eliot did whatever he could to get yucks during his four minutes of airtime.

“His reputation for using humor during his weather stint on TV came about by accident,” said Tim Kiska, associate professor at the University of Michigan/Dearborn and author of the book “From Soupy to Nuts: A History of Detroit TV.”

“He made an offhanded remark, which made the anchorman laugh off camera. After that, he started working more and more humor into his broadcasts. During the 1960s, Sonny was the most popular and most recognized personality in Detroit television.”

Eliot also had a serious side.

“Most people only knew the Sonny Eliot personality from TV and radio,” said Kiska, a former reporter for The Detroit News and Free Press. “But the other Sonny was a serious intellectual and very well-read. He could discuss any topic. He also had an amazing grasp of the technical end of broadcasting, both radio and TV.

“When he would give you tips, it was like getting a guitar lesson from Eric Clapton.”

Eliot also tried to give the forecast as quickly as possible to allow more time for his wacky demeanor.

He dispensed safety tips, warning motorists to look out for children, especially if the youngsters were driving.

Former first lady Barbara Bush once listened to Eliot while on hold waiting to be interviewed by the station. All she could talk about during the interview was that crazy weatherman.

“His career was beyond stunning,” Kiska said. “He started TV in the 1940s and finished on radio in 2010; that’s seven decades in the business for goodness sakes. Nobody ever had a career like that and nobody ever will.”

An award winner

Eliot garnered a number of awards, rewards and honors including citations from the American Legion and the American Meteorological Society, the Toastmaster International Award and the Michigan Association of Broadcasters Excellence Award for Broadcast personality.

He was inducted into the Michigan Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 2002 and the Michigan Journalism Hall of Fame in 2005.

When Eliot was elected to the Michigan Broadcasting Hall of Fame, his boss at WWJ-AM said the electors had no choice.

“It wouldn’t be a Hall of Fame without him,” said Rich Homberg, who now is president of Detroit Public Television. “Sonny is the Michigan history of TV and radio.”

In early days, Eliot’s local fame grew as he hosted the TV station’s yearly coverage of the Thanksgiving Day Parade.

He also was host of “At the Zoo,” a TV children’s program, for 17 years.

When people visited the Detroit Zoo, one of the first things they did was look for Eliot.

For six decades, people looking for the weather or a chuckle did the same thing.

In one his final interviews before retiring in September 2010, Eliot was asked to summarize his career: “As the late Jimmy Stewart said, ‘it’s been a wonderful life.’ I have no complaints.”

fdonnelly@detnews.com

(313) 223-4186

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121116/METRO/211160390#ixzz2COjfGr8w

 

Mayer Hawthorne

The Walk

This is uniquely Detroit Music!

 

“The bell has ‘ring-a-ding-a-dined'” for legendary weatherman Sonny Eliot.

The wacky broadcaster — who became an icon during a 63-year career on Detroit television and radio — was 91.

According to WWJ-AM (950) — the radio station he called home for decades, from 1947 to 2010 — Eliot died at his Farmington Hills home with family by his side. His family made the announcement Friday morning.

For six decades, Eliot delighted listeners — and TV viewers on the Evening News Association’s WWJ-TV, now WDIV-TV — with an unrelenting barrage of quips, funny noises, unusual city names and groaners.

More borscht-belt comedian than meteorologist, he delighted in coining new words (rainy, foggy conditions were “froggy”) and giving the weather in far-flung locales whose names he willfully mispronounced.

His broadcasts were a collection of accents, funny noises, cornball humor and analogies from Mars. Somewhere in there was the forecast.

He went on long tangents unrelated to the weather and lapsed into a foreign language when telling the temperature in that country.

Whatever it took to get a chuckle.

“Sonny just oozed personality,” said Matt Friedman, a Farmington Hills marketing executive who had worked with Eliot at WWJ. “He was the same in person as he was on the radio. He was hysterical.”

Long before Doppler radar and blow-dried anchors, TV news in Detroit was populated by outsized characters such as Eliot.

He loved to combine words, scribbling his inventions on the weatherboard. Snow and fog were “snog.” Sunny and mild were “smild.”

Then there were his goofy expressions.

A lousy day was as pleasant as diaper rash. A town was so small it would take two to make a colon. Never put off until tomorrow what you can ignore altogether.

And there were those favorite bits telling the temperature in distant countries, in the native language.

Eliot would get the actual temperature in Buenos Aires from the wire services on the air and then say “It’s 85 degrees, ochenta y cinco, in Buenos Aires,” in flawless Spanish.

“It’s all about research, robbery and stealth,” he once said about his broadcasts.

Eliot’s early years

Born Marvin Eliot Schlossberg in Detroit in 1920, Eliot grew up on Hastings Street, the youngest child of Latvian immigrants Jacob and Jeanette Schlossberg, who owned a hardware store in Detroit.

The year of his birth was always a matter of conjecture because he was forever shaving years off his age.

Eliot wanted to be an actor, which didn’t surprise anyone aware of his hambone.

While attending Wayne State University, he had small roles in school and professional plays and on national radio programs made in Detroit, such as “The Lone Ranger” and “The Green Hornet.”

He even acted in a German POW camp.

He was the pilot of a B-24 bomber nicknamed Doodley Squat that was shot down over Germany during World War II.

It was poor planning to be captured by the folks you just bombed, he later joked.

During 14 months at Stalag Luft I, he wrote and acted in skits and musicals to entertain the other prisoners.

“I worked up some comedy to entertain the guys,” he said in a 1980 interview. “How could I miss? I had a captive audience.”

A weatherman is born

After returning from the war, he tried to make it on Broadway but failed.

Meanwhile, in 1946, a new medium had arrived in Detroit. WWJ-TV became the first TV station in Michigan.

Eliot got a bit part on a children’s TV show involving puppets, “Let’s See Willy Dooit.”

He was willing to do just about anything to expand his presence on TV, pleading with bosses, auditioning for various roles, taking whatever was offered.

When the TV station was looking for a weatherman in 1956, Eliot jumped at it.

He had little knowledge of meteorology. What he did have was a love of English and shtick.

“Meteorology is just two weeks behind a farmer with arthritis,” he said years later.

During the first three months, his broadcasts were straight, dry recitations of temperatures and weather conditions.

One day, he told TV viewers that it was 55 degrees in Las Vegas.

“Ten the hard way,” someone said off camera, using the craps term.

Crew members laughed. The boss didn’t get mad. And a career was born.

After that, Eliot did whatever he could to get yucks during his four minutes of airtime.

“His reputation for using humor during his weather stint on TV came about by accident,” said Tim Kiska, associate professor at the University of Michigan/Dearborn and author of the book “From Soupy to Nuts: A History of Detroit TV.”

“He made an offhanded remark, which made the anchorman laugh off camera. After that, he started working more and more humor into his broadcasts. During the 1960s, Sonny was the most popular and most recognized personality in Detroit television.”

Eliot also had a serious side.

“Most people only knew the Sonny Eliot personality from TV and radio,” said Kiska, a former reporter for The Detroit News and Free Press. “But the other Sonny was a serious intellectual and very well-read. He could discuss any topic. He also had an amazing grasp of the technical end of broadcasting, both radio and TV.

“When he would give you tips, it was like getting a guitar lesson from Eric Clapton.”

Eliot also tried to give the forecast as quickly as possible to allow more time for his wacky demeanor.

He dispensed safety tips, warning motorists to look out for children, especially if the youngsters were driving.

Former first lady Barbara Bush once listened to Eliot while on hold waiting to be interviewed by the station. All she could talk about during the interview was that crazy weatherman.

“His career was beyond stunning,” Kiska said. “He started TV in the 1940s and finished on radio in 2010; that’s seven decades in the business for goodness sakes. Nobody ever had a career like that and nobody ever will.”

An award winner

Eliot garnered a number of awards, rewards and honors including citations from the American Legion and the American Meteorological Society, the Toastmaster International Award and the Michigan Association of Broadcasters Excellence Award for Broadcast personality.

He was inducted into the Michigan Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 2002 and the Michigan Journalism Hall of Fame in 2005.

When Eliot was elected to the Michigan Broadcasting Hall of Fame, his boss at WWJ-AM said the electors had no choice.

“It wouldn’t be a Hall of Fame without him,” said Rich Homberg, who now is president of Detroit Public Television. “Sonny is the Michigan history of TV and radio.”

In early days, Eliot’s local fame grew as he hosted the TV station’s yearly coverage of the Thanksgiving Day Parade.

He also was host of “At the Zoo,” a TV children’s program, for 17 years.

When people visited the Detroit Zoo, one of the first things they did was look for Eliot.

For six decades, people looking for the weather or a chuckle did the same thing.

In one his final interviews before retiring in September 2010, Eliot was asked to summarize his career: “As the late Jimmy Stewart said, ‘it’s been a wonderful life.’ I have no complaints.”

fdonnelly@detnews.com

(313) 223-4186

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121116/METRO/211160390#ixzz2COjfGr8w

 

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”