Downtown Detroit Days and 1968

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Gladys Knight & The Pips
I heard it through the grapevine

Aretha …Chain of fools

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL

RIP John Lennon (there is a connection)

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Howard Cosell  August 8, 1983 X 28760 credit:  Arnold Newman - assign

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1970s Memories

1970

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John Lennon on MNF…

Howard Cosell tells the world that John Lennon is gone…

Turn out the lights…

Here is a great column by The Sports Guy-Bill Simmons

Hank Williams Jr.

Epic Early 70’s TV Commercials

John Lennon
Mind Games

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

WORLD SERIES 2012

GO GET EM TIGERS!

Mitch Albom

 

Tom Verducci

1968 Tiger Warm ups

Detroit News

October 24, 2012

Tigers ready for prime time

  • By BOB WOJNOWSKI

San Francisco — They have MVP and Cy Young trophies. They have batting titles and home run titles and RBI titles and enough All-Star appearances to load the pages of recent history.

The Tigers have accomplished plenty, and it means plenty. It only means everything if they take the last step. They need to win this now, after all they’ve spent financially, physically and emotionally.

The Tigers have been here before, but not really. The team that opens the World Series tonight against the Giants is almost entirely different than the group that lost the 2006 World Series. Heck, it’s considerably different than the team that lost in last year’s playoffs.

These Tigers are star-heavy favorites, desperate to deliver Detroit’s first World Series title since 1984. Just getting here isn’t the point anymore, not that it ever was. But when you have Miguel Cabrera in a Triple Crown season and Prince Fielder in his prime and the best pitcher in the game in Justin Verlander, you don’t tiptoe into baseball’s grand classic.

It’s different this time. It’s less fanciful, less frightful, and much more urgent.

“That (favorite’s tag) is more for reading material than anything else,” Jim Leyland said. “We’re not dumb, we do learn from the past. Even though a lot of people thought we just became fat cats in 2006 and said, ‘Oh well, we’re in it, what’s the difference,’ that wasn’t it at all.”

Not that it really matters because only three players from the ’06 Tigers — Verlander, Omar Infante, Ramon Santiago — are on this team. But Leyland and management adjusted to another lengthy layoff after an ALCS sweep, working out daily at Comerica Park, thanks to good weather.

And now their pitching staff looks sufficiently primed, starting with Verlander, naturally. He opens Game 1 with loads of rest, while the Giants counter with revived lefty Barry Zito, who didn’t even make the postseason roster two years ago when the Giants won the World Series. It should be an early advantage for the Tigers because Verlander is on yet another mission, and it’s not a mission of mercy. He’s different this time, translating regular-season dominance into postseason success.

But as the game’s quirks repeatedly show, it’s never as simple as matching up the rosters and lining up the stars. Ask the Rangers, who lost the past two World Series, then were drummed in the wildcard round this year.

Favored but wary

All the spectacular individual performances wouldn’t necessarily be wasted if the Tigers didn’t win it all, but they’d be assigned a humbler place in history. Most odds and experts favor the Tigers, who just swept the Yankees, while the Giants rallied and won a Game 7 after trailing the Cardinals three games to one. In fact, the Giants have won six straight elimination games this postseason, which shows they know how to find danger — and find their way out.

The Giants do prefer things the difficult way, apparently. They hit the fewest home runs in the majors, but have a terrific road record. In the narrow view, this is Tigers power versus Giants pluck, sizzle versus spunk, although it’s worth noting the Giants actually won 94 games to the Tigers’ 88.

“We’re definitely playing our best baseball, but it’s always tough to play a team that never gives up,” centerfielder Austin Jackson said shortly after the Tigers arrived Tuesday. “They’re able to come back at any time, at any point in a game. They showed they weren’t done when people thought they were done. We’ve had our struggles and been able to do the same thing.”

The opponent sort of looks the same as the Cardinals in ’06. San Francisco is a spirited bunch putting pieces back together, and rebounding again and again. The Giants have done it with rejuvenated pitchers such as Zito and Tim Lincecum, and resurrected scrappers such as Marco Scutaro.

They’ve been rolling in front of their loud, giddy crowd at AT&T Park, outscoring the Cardinals by an astonishing 20-1 the last three games. And the Tigers still have their standard concerns, the ones that surfaced during an unsteady regular season — defense, the bullpen, the hitting.

Seasoned crew

Leyland doesn’t know how he’ll use closer Jose Valverde, and it’ll be interesting to see if Delmon Young can continue the hot streak that landed him the ALCS MVP. But the Tigers have experience everywhere it matters, from the deep, powerful starting rotation, to the front office in Dave Dombrowski, to the manager, to 83-year-old owner Mike Ilitch. It’s not necessarily a one-shot deal because the Tigers have a talented core, but the longer you wait, the tougher it gets.

“I don’t know if we’re the favorite, because they’ve been playing the last couple games and we’ve been off for about five days,” said catcher Gerald Laird, who won the World Series with St. Louis last season. “Honestly, there’s no clear-cut favorite in my eyes. But if our pitching does what it’s capable of doing like it did last series, I like our chances.”

A lot of people like their chances. It’s the Tigers’ opportunity to go from gaudy oddity to worthy champion, and they won’t get many better chances than this.

bob.wojnowski@detnews.com

twitter.com/bobwojnowski

Series: Best-of-seven format, tonight-Thursday and Wednesday, Oct.  31-Thursday, Nov. 1, AT&T Park; Saturday-Monday, Comerica Park
First  pitch: All games 8:07 p.m.
TV/radio: All games on Fox/WXYT
Series probables: Tonight — RHP Justin Verlander (3-0, 0.74 ERA)  vs. LHP Barry Zito (1-0, 1.74). Thursday — LHP Doug Fister (0-0, 1.35)  vs. LHP Madison Bumgarner (0-2, 11.25). Saturday — RHP Ryan Vogelsong  (2-0, 1.42) vs. RHP Anibal Sanchez (1-1, 1.35). Sunday — RHP Matt Cain  (2-2, 3.52) vs. RHP Max Scherzer (1-0, 0.82). Monday* — Matchups to be  determined. Wednesday, Oct. 31* — Matchups to be determined. Thursday, Nov. 1* — Matchups to be determined

Check out this Phil Coke Interview

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

RIP Alex Karras

Where do you begin?

Clowning with Dick the Bruiser

Mongo

All American DT at Iowa-2nd in Heisman Trophy vote to John David Crow in 1957

Outland Trophy Winner-1957

Lead Iowa to their 1st Rose Bowl

College Football HOF-1991

Detroit Lion All Pro—12 year career

Alex Karras on MNF 1976

Schlitz Malt Liquor

On Match Game

Faygo

MONGO!!!

Drafted out of Iowa in 1958, the defensive tackle was listed at 6-feet-2 and 248 pounds, small by today’s standards (Ndamukong Suh is 6-4, 307) – and he wore glasses.

• First- or second-team all-pro every year during the 1960s, except for one.

• 1963: Suspended, along with Green Bay running back Paul Hornung, for one season for gambling on NFL games. (Hornung elected to Hall of Fame in 1986; Karras hasn’t been.)

• Missed one game in 12 pro seasons, ending in 1970.

• Lost his last Lions game by the oddest of scores, 5-0, to Dallas in the first round of the ’70 playoffs.

• Reported to training camp in 1971 but was released by his old pal and then-Lions coach Joe Schmidt; playing career over at age 35

• Took up professional wrestling before he signed with the Lions and returned to it when suspended for the 1963 season. Memorable bouts included ones with Dick the Bruiser.

• Part owner of the Lindell AC , a sports bar in downtown Detroit.—MUST READ this NYT article…

October 8, 2012

Amid Newfound Glory, Echoes of Old Detroit

By BILL MORRIS

For more than a century, the city of Detroit has been driven by a pair of powerful but erratic engines: cars and sports. Detroiters are no strangers to the sorrows these engines can bring: layoffs, factory shutdowns, losing streaks, even winless seasons. Yet, many Detroiters are feeling giddy these days. The auto industry has come roaring back from the brink of ruin, and the Tigers are back in the playoffs for the second straight year — routine stuff in the Bronx, perhaps, but something that hasn’t happened in the Motor City since the 1930s.

To top it off, the star of this year’s Tigers is a slugger named Miguel Cabrera, who led the American League in home runs, batting average and runs batted in, a trifecta last accomplished nearly half a century ago by Carl Yastrzemski of the Boston Red Sox, and by only a handful of others in the history of the game.

The team plays in a sparkling downtown park that was built a dozen years ago and named, to the dismay of many purists, after a bank. More than three million fans have passed through its turnstiles so far this year, and it’s a safe bet that many of them don’t remember or have managed to forget the team’s previous home, a great sooty iceberg built in 1912 just west of downtown. Tiger Stadium is gone to dust now, memories of it growing dimmer every time Cabrera whacks another ball over the outfield wall at Comerica Park.

But Detroiters tend to have a deep, quirky sense of pride, and more than a few of them will tell you that there’s a bygone relic even more worthy of mourning than Tiger Stadium. Or the downtown J. L. Hudson department store. Or Cass Tech High School, whose alumni roster includes John DeLorean, Lily Tomlin and Diana Ross.

That other place was a bar called the Lindell A.C. It was in an unexceptional-looking brick building a few blocks from Tiger Stadium, but it became a legend, a place where the famous rubbed elbows with the unknown.

It was first opened in 1949 in the no-star Lindell Hotel by Meleti Butsicaris. In the 1950s, a regular customer suggested putting signed photographs of athletes on the walls. He even showed Butsicaris and his sons, Johnny and Jimmy, how to cut a baseball bat in half lengthwise, the better to screw it into the wall. Soon other bats and baseballs, hockey sticks and pucks were added, along with the jerseys of local gods like Al Kaline, Norm Cash, Gordie Howe and Dave Bing, a Pistons star who is now the mayor of Detroit. But the maraschino cherry on the memorabilia was surely Lions linebacker Wayne Walker’s jockstrap, which was fastened to a plaque in a prominent place on the barnacled walls. The customer who came up with the original suggestion about hanging the signed photographs was a Yankees infielder named Billy Martin.

After relocating to the corner of Michigan and Cass Avenues in 1963, the Butsicaris family added “A.C.” to the name at the suggestion of a local sports columnist and repeat customer named Doc Greene — a wry swipe at the swells who patronized the nearby Detroit Athletic Club. The Lindell A.C.’s burgers were out of this world, there were three television sets, and the place was always jumping. Jimmy Butsicaris installed himself at the corner of the bar every night, where he could keep one eye on the door and one on the cash register. “He didn’t want to have any seepage,” the owner of a nearby bar says. “And he wanted to know everybody who walked in that door — cop or robber, friend or foe.” For foes, Jimmy kept a set of brass knuckles in his pocket.

In 1963, Pete Rozelle, the commissioner of the N.F.L., suspended Paul Hornung, the golden boy of the Green Bay Packers, and Lions defensive lineman Alex Karras for gambling on games in the Lindell A.C. Rozelle also ordered Karras to divest himself of his one-third interest in the saloon. Hornung was contrite; Karras was outraged. The scandal was excellent for the Butsicarises’s business.

To work out his anger, Karras took up professional wrestling during his suspension. One night, he and a future opponent, Dick the Bruiser, went at each other inside the Lindell A.C., an epic brawl that left the place — and Karras — in tatters.

Six years later, Martin, then manager of the Minnesota Twins, got into a dispute inside the Lindell A.C. with one of his own pitchers, burly Dave Boswell, a 20-game winner that year. Though Martin was giving away several inches and many more pounds, they took their differences into the alley behind the bar. When it was over, Boswell’s face required 20 stitches while Martin’s needed just seven. Apparently impressed by Martin’s way of handling his pitching staff, the Tigers hired him two years later, and he led the team to the division title in 1972.

But perhaps the thing that truly set the Lindell A.C. apart — and the thing that reveals just how different its world was from the world we live in today — was the way professional athletes and other celebrities, from Mickey Mantle to Milton Berle to Andre the Giant, mingled with ordinary fans.

Terry Foster had a ringside seat for this cultural shift. His mother, Roxanne, worked at the Lindell A.C. for 20 years, and Foster, now 53, worked there as a cook while attending Cass Tech, then tended bar during college. “I remember going in after a Tigers game and seeing Willie Horton, Earl Wilson and Gates Brown sitting next to fans, having a beer and a burger, just talking to the fans,” says Foster, who writes a sports column for The Detroit News and hosts a radio sports show. “It was almost like they’d just gotten off the third shift at G.M. Players from all the visiting teams came into the Lindell A.C., and there wasn’t all this fawning. They were one of the fellas. Today, I see athletes at parties, and they’re roped off in their private area with their ladies. That doesn’t do it for me.”

The ballplayers back then, of course, often had little choice. Most of them had to work jobs during the off-season because they weren’t multimillionaires who breathed their own ether, safely shielded from hoi polloi. It was a time of greater intimacy, rougher edges and, yes, more excess. It was also more colorful, more vivid, in many ways more alive than our high-dollar, heart-smart, smoke-free, sanitized times.

Vaughn Derderian Sr., who runs the Anchor Bar in downtown Detroit, agrees with Foster. “The players don’t hang out anymore,” says Derderian, 65, whose family has been in the bar business since the 1920s. “The reason is because they’re a little smarter — and they’re making a whole lot more money. They don’t want to get hassled by the fans. The Lindell A.C. was one of the last places where that contact happened.”

It had stopped happening by the time the bar closed for good in 2002. Four years later, the building was demolished to make way for a bus station.

“To call it legendary is an understatement,” Derderian adds. “It was the first sports bar in the country. Now there’s one on every corner.”

There’s a big one on the corner of Woodward Avenue and Montcalm Street, across the street from Comerica Park. It’s called the Hockeytown Cafe. It has 45 TVs, including 30 63-inch plasma sets, and its walls are plastered with sports memorabilia.

There are only three things missing. Actual athletes mingling with the customers. A tough little Greek guy sitting at the corner of the bar with a set of brass knuckles in his pocket. And Wayne Walker’s jockstrap high on the wall.

Bill Morris grew up in Detroit in the 1950s and ’60s. He is the author of the novels “Motor City” and “All Souls’ Day,” and has finished another, “Vic #43,” set during the 1967 Detroit riot and the Tigers’ 1968 championship season.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: October 10, 2012

Because of an editing error, a picture credit with an article on Tuesday about Lindell A.C., a famous bar near Tigers Stadium in Detroit that closed in 2002, misidentified the photographer. The picture of memorabilia on the wall of the bar was taken by John T. Greilick of The Detroit News, not J. Kyle Keener of The Detroit Free Press.

 

• In 1968, he and teammates played themselves in “Paper Lion,” the movie version of George Plimpton’s book in which Plimpton tried out with the Lions.

• Starting in 1970, displayed a dry sense of humor and gained notoriety during repeat appearances on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.”

• Played Mongo in Mel Brooks’ “Blazing Saddles” in 1974.

• Color commentator on “Monday Night Football,” 1974-76.

• Played George Zaharias opposite Susan Clark in the TV movie “Babe” (1975), the story of Babe Didrickson.

• Karras and Clark married in 1980.

• Starred in the TV sitcom “Webster” with Clark and Emmanuel Lewis, 1983-89.

• Hosted “Saturday Night Live” in 1985.

• Returned to Detroit in 2003 for the 40th anniversary of the publication of “Paper Lion,” appearing with, among others, Plimpton, Schmidt, Lem Barney, Ron Kramer, Mike Lucci and Earl Morrall. But the loudest cheers at Ford Field were for the famed Fearsome Foursome defensive line of Karras, Roger Brown, Darris McCord and Sam Williams.

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Detroit loses a legend

Lynch had been the Wings’ public-address announcer since 1985, the same year he received the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award from the Hockey Hall of Fame for outstanding contributions as a hockey broadcaster. (David Guralnick / The Detroit News)

RIP Budd Lynch

Read about Budd here

Neal Rubin

‘One-armed bandit’ Lynch was full of laughs

Neal Rubin

Red Wings announcer Bud Lynch is helped down the carpet by Detroit Red Wings’ Nicklas Lidstrom during a pre-game ceremony honoring Lynch for his 60 years with the team in 2009. (David Guralnick / The Detroit News)

You couldn’t tell a story poking fun at Budd Lynch without Budd coming back with a better one.

He loved to laugh — the older he became, the louder and more distinctive that goose-honk was — and he loved to laugh at himself.

Lynch, who died Tuesday morning at 95, lost his right arm in France six weeks after D-Day. Back home, first in his native Ontario and then in Detroit, he happily answered to “lefty” or “the one-armed bandit,” nicknames he at least embraced if he didn’t introduce them in the first place.

Even the judge jabbed him when he became a U.S. citizen in 1950.

The Detroit Red Wings’ former publicist, former broadcaster and eternal public address announcer figured that if he was earning a living and raising kids here, he should vote and pledge allegiance here, too. He showed up at the courthouse with some family members and a bunch of friends, prepared to be solemn on such an august occasion, but then His Honor peered down from the bench.

“We will dispense,” the judge told the clerk, “with raising his right arm.”

Budd had a house in Wyandotte, and I’m in Oakland County, but I’d see him at least once a year, at the Budd Lynch Celebrity Golf Classic on Grosse Ile. It’s a benefit for the Guidance Center in Southgate, and before the 23rd annual installment in June, someone crunched the numbers and realized it had just crossed the $1 million mark.

In tribute, the charity surprised him at a pre-event party with an announcement: it had established the Budd Lynch Endowment Fund for Children. His six daughters haven’t said yet where they would like memorial donations to go, but if you’re inclined to support his work with kids, you can make out a check to the Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan and send it to the Guidance Center, Development Department, 13101 Allen Road, Southgate, MI 48195.

Budd wasn’t just a name on the title. The planning committee has a meeting Thursday, and marketing director Al Sebastian says it’ll feel strange to not have him there.

Every year, Budd would help hustle up celebrities and auction items and gifts for the kids who came to a golf clinic before the outing. It’s amazing how many goodies you can fit in the trunk of a Lincoln Town Car. Into his 90s, he’d play a few holes, swinging right-handed clubs backhand and then switching to a left-handed putter.

He’d taught himself to be darned good at the game; on his best day years ago, when he shot an 82 at Plum Hollow Country Club in Southfield, he beat Gordie Howe.

“Gordie was so steamed he wouldn’t talk to me,” he said, but at the golf outing, Budd talked to everyone. First with his late wife, Thelma, and then with his longtime girlfriend, Nancy Tuinier, he’d hold court in the grillroom or on a cart, offering welcomes and thanks.

The outing next summer will be a memorial, Sebastian said, a chance for everyone to imagine Budd’s laugh and picture him in his Izod sweater with the right sleeve pinned down.

He’d shake hands, left to left, and somehow he always made it feel like that absent arm was pulling you close.

nrubin@detnews.com

(313) 222-1874

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

King Miguel wears the (TRIPLE) Crown

I cannot believe that we got him…this town has no idea of what an amazing player we have…he should be embraced and loved as with our great stars of the past!

It has been 45 years since it was done last.

Miguel tips his cap to the very gracious KC crowd…

Celebrating the 2012 AL Central Division Title…

October 4, 2012 at 2:07 am

Bob Wojnowski

Triple Crown a perfect fit for Miguel Cabrera

Detroit Tigers third baseman Miguel Cabrera waves as he leaves the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fourth inning Oct. 3, 2012. Cabrera became baseball’s first Triple Crown winner of the 21st century, and the first since Boston’s Carl Yastrzemski in 1967, during the game against Kansas City, which the Tigers won 1-0. (Robin Buckson / The Detroit News)

Kansas City, Mo. — This is a mark for the ages, a stirring ode to old-school baseball, when hitters pulled their socks up high and just kept slugging. Miguel Cabrera did what supposedly couldn’t be done anymore, and he did it with unflinching power and uncommon calm.

Cabrera completed the unthinkable Wednesday night, capturing the game’s first Triple Crown in 45 years. And you know what’s really amazing? He’s so consistently great, once the achievement was possible, there was little doubt he’d do it.

With two outs in the fourth inning against the Royals, the game was stopped, and this was it. Cabrera was playing third, and replacement Ramon Santiago trotted in from the bench, and the crowd immediately knew what it meant. Jim Leyland recognized his star had done enough, and he gave Cabrera the moment he’d earned.

As Cabrera left the field, the crowd stood and clapped, and players in both dugouts did the same. He doffed his cap and embraced Leyland with a huge hug, and the ovation didn’t stop until Cabrera bounded back out and waved again. It was classy of the Kansas City crowd, and in the years ahead, this Triple Crown should take its place among the remarkable seasons in baseball history.

“I don’t believe this is happening right now,” Cabrera said afterward, emotion heavy in his voice. “I don’t believe three weeks ago it’s gonna happen. I don’t believe it’s supposed to happen. But you always dream. When Skip took me out, I didn’t know what to do. My mind was blank, I don’t know how to explain it. It was hard the last two weeks because everybody was talking about it.”

Cabrera was 0-for-2 Wednesday night and finished with a .330 average, 44 home runs and 139 RBIs, numbers similar to Carl Yastrzemski’s Triple Crown in 1967 — .326, 44 home runs, 121 RBIs. But with more teams and more players and more sluggers and more specialized bullpens and more media scrutiny, Cabrera’s accomplishment has to be considered even more impressive.

Handles attention well

Not that it matters to him. He might have played the whole game but Leyland had a plan, and shortly after the Angels’ Mike Trout took his last at-bat in Seattle, Cabrera came out. There were tense moments a few innings later when the Yankees’ Curtis Granderson hit his second home run against the Red Sox, his 43rd. But with the Yankees rolling, Granderson was pulled for a pinch-hitter and the feat was official.

Cabrera knew it for sure as he sat in the clubhouse with Prince Fielder and a couple other teammates, watching on TV. Justin Verlander presented him with an engraved commemorative watch. Fielder could scarcely believe he was watching his buddy complete history.

“This guy is so awesome, he doesn’t even know what he just did,” Fielder said. “He’s the best hitter in the game, the best teammate, the most humble guy I know. He’s just the best ever. I wouldn’t even have had the chance to be here if he didn’t move to third base for me. Awesome.”

Trout finished a few points behind at .326 and Granderson joined Josh Hamilton with 43 home runs. As loudly as the Royals fans saluted Cabrera, imagine the roar when the Tigers open the playoffs Saturday night against the Athletics at Comerica Park.

Leyland’s strategy with Cabrera Wednesday night was perfect. He could’ve sat him. Cabrera had a commanding lead and most of his competitors were just about finished, so this was largely ceremonial. Leyland said he played Cabrera because, “I think the whole nation should see it.”

It was worth the sight. A crowd of 30,383 was there, and the Royals announced a stunning 12,503 tickets were sold just on Wednesday. Afterward, Yastrzemski and Frank Robinson, the only other living Triple Crown winners, sent congratulations.

“It couldn’t have been better,” Leyland said. “It was a great scene, a great night for baseball. I’ve managed a lot of great players, and I’ve never seen anything like this.”

As daunting as Cabrera’s overall numbers are, his blistering stretch drive was just as astonishing. With the Tigers three games behind the White Sox on Sept. 10, Cabrera hit .356 with nine home runs and 23 RBIs the next 21 games.

Cabrera isn’t quite the Reluctant Superstar, but he’s never been comfortable standing out. That’s why he was so willing to switch from first to third base to accommodate Fielder, a classic team-oriented move. His focus during the dual chase — division title and Triple Crown — was unshakeable. He loves hitting and hates sitting, so it wasn’t difficult for him to keep playing.

Cabrera, 29, isn’t a big fan of singular attention, but he handled it well. The next debate will be whether he’s done enough to win AL MVP over Trout, and it looks like a no-brainer to me. But then, I don’t maneuver deftly through statistical theorems and algorithms.

“It’ll be probably the greatest thing I’ll ever see in my career,” catcher Alex Avila said. “He knows what’s at stake, but he’s not concerned about it. He just wants to win a World Series, like we all do.”

Kaline’s endorsement

Cabrera’s playful nonchalance is real, and I think the big-teddy-bear personality is his shield against intrusions and pressure. He has no desire to weigh in on the MVP debate, except to acknowledge what everyone does, that Trout also has had an unbelievable season.

But sage eyes know exactly what’s on display.

“How many times can I say he’s the greatest I’ve ever seen in a Tiger uniform, by far?” Tigers legend Al Kaline said. “He’s the most feared hitter in baseball today. I just don’t want to see the computer guys take over the game of baseball like they’ve taken over every other business. In my opinion, Miggy should win it in a landslide.”

Both sides have their MVP arguments, but when the number-crunching supersedes the baseball-crunching, it makes you long for simpler times.

Defining levels of greatness is a tricky thing, but what Cabrera did requires no dressed-up statistical qualifiers. Nobody in the world hits the ball better, farther or more consistently. Cabrera doesn’t like to talk much, but that’s OK. Nothing more needs to be said.

bob.wojnowski@detnews.com

twitter.com/bobwojnowski

Triple Crown winners

Triple Crown winners in the
modern era of baseball (since 1900)

 1901 Nap Lajoie
PHA
.426 AVG
14 HRs
125 RBIs

 

1909 Ty (The Georgia Peach) Cobb

DET
.377 AVG
9 HRs
107 RBIs

 

1922 Rogers (The Rajah) Hornsby

STL
.402 AVG
42 HRs
152 RBIs

1925 Rogers Hornsby
STL
.403 AVG
39 HRs
143 RBIs

***Note-In 1933 Jimmie Foxx & Chuck Klein both won the Triple Crown playing in Philadelphia—What an amazing season to cheer a town during the 1st Great Depression

 1933 Chuck Klein
PHI
.368 AVG
28 HRs
120 RBIs

 1933 Jimmie (Double X) Foxx
PHA
.356 AVG
48 HRs
163 RBIs

 1934 Lou (Iron Horse) Gehrig
NYY
.363 AVG
49 HRs
165 RBIs

 1937 Joe (Ducky) Medwick
STL Cardinals Gas House Gang
.374 AVG
31 HRs
154 RBIs

 1942 Ted (Splendid Splinter, The Kid, Teddy Ballgame) Williams
BOS
.356 AVG
36 HRs
137 RBIs
1947 Ted Williams
BOS
.343 AVG
32 HRs
114 RBIs

 1956 Mickey (The Mick) Mantle
NYY
.353 AVG
52 HRs
130 RBIs


1966-Frank Robinson
BAL
.316 AVG
49 HRs
122 RBIs


 1967-Carl (YAZ) Yastrzemski
BOS
.326 AVG
44 HRs
121 RBIs

 2012-Miguel (Miggy) Cabrera
DET
.330 AVG
44 HRs
139 RBIs

Triple Crown race

Miguel Cabrera went 0-for-2 Wednesday against the Royals before leaving the game in the fourth inning.
Here were his at-bats:
First inning: Flied out to center
Fourth inning: Struck out swinging, replaced at third by Ramon Santiago

As we are from Detroit…Its ALWAYS a good time to listen to The Temptations
Its Growing

Don’t look back

Since I lost my baby

You’re my everything

I wish it would rain

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Eddie, David, Gram Parsons and More!

Eddie and David were two of the lead singer of the seminal Motown group The Temptations

Shoeshine Boy-Eddie Kendricks

Statue of a fool-David Ruffin

Double Cross-David Ruffin

Gram Parsons/The Flying Burrito Brother are the greatest
artist(s) you may never have heard of…

Gram Parsons was a member of The Byrds.
He was a friend of Keith Richard and released a version of Wild Horses a year before The Stones did.
Hot Burrito #1

Wild Horses

Sin City

Los Angeles Vicinity, CA Earthquake, Feb 1971

Posted July 30th, 2008 by Stu Beitler

16 DIE, 54 ARE MISSING IN LA QUAKE; MANY HURT.

Los Angeles (AP) — A powerful earthquake jolted Southern California at dawn today causing at least 16 deaths, scores of injuries and heavy damage to buildings, highways, bridges and other facilities.
Authorities said 54 persons were unaccounted for at a Veterans Administration Hospital facility in the San Fernando Valley where seven bodies were found.


Police said two buildings at the facility were leveled by the 6:01 a.m. temblor.
Three others were reported killed at Olive View Sanitarium a mile away. Walls collapsed there.
The shock was centered in the rugged San Gabriel Mountains 26 miles northwest of Los Angeles. The San Fernando Valley is the closest major population center. Hard hit, too, were the towns of Newhall and Saugus, just 10 miles from the center.
The Veterans Administration facility was described as “quite old” with 420 beds. Victims were found amid rubble. Officials said five persons were seriously injured and 53 suffered minor hurts.


Travel into the Newhall – Saugus area, with a population of some 70,000, was virtually blocked by landslides and downed bridges and telephone communication was spotty.
The Newhall newspaper reported fires in the downtown district, virtually all windows in structures broken, and numerous injuries.


The coroner[‘s office reported four dead in Los Angeles County, which includes Newhall and Saugus. There were unofficial reports of other deaths.


The initial temblor and several strong aftershocks created cracks in the earth-fill dam of Van Norman Lake reservoir, largest in the city system with 6.7 billion gallons. Residents were ordered evacuated from the area in the heavily populated San Fernando Valley as “some leakage” was reported.


The quake caused widespread cracking of walls and plaster, broke thousands of windows, wrecked parts of freeways, destroyed several bridges including some over freeways.


Hospitals reported treating scores of persons for cuts and bruises from flying glass and falling bricks and plaster.
Experts said the shock was not the “great quake” that some have said will occur someday on the San Andreas, California’s major fault, which traverses the state north-south. One seismologist placed the center “very close” to the San Gabriel fault, part of a network of earth fractures in the San Andreas system, and said there’s a “strong suspicion” it was to blame. The San Gabriel fault caused a severe earthquake in 1893.
The shock was felt from Fresno to the north to the Mexican border to the south, a distance of 350 miles, and as far inland as Las Vegas, Nev.


Travel from Los Angeles airports was not affected by the quake.
About five hours after the quake Gov. Ronald Reagan declared a state of emergency in Los Angeles, a formal step making all resources of the state and various communities available in case of need.
Two interstate highways –Nos. 5 and 405 — were closed at some points in the Los Angeles area because of buckled pavement or collapsed overpasses.


Experts assigned it a magnitude of 6.5 on the Richter scale, which rates major quakes at 7 or more. The shock was the strongest in this area since the devastating Tehachapi quake of 1952, which killed 12. That one was centered 100 miles north and had a magnitude of 7.2. Today’s shock was rated as having approximately the same magnitude at the 1933 shock in nearby Long Beach which killed 115 persons and caused $40 million damage.
The quake hit as most of Los Angeles County’s nearly 7 million residents were asleep, or getting ready for work. Many siad they were nearly knocked out of bed, and were startled by the clatter of dishes falling from shelves, plaster cracking and windows shattering.


A motorists on a freeway likened the effect to a blowout.
Damage was heavy in downtown Los Angeles and in its bedroom communities in the San Fernando Valley, population 1-3 million, which is even closer to the center. Hardest hit were two towns closest to the temblor, Newhall and Saugus, just 10 miles away.


There were hundreds of reports of shattered windows, including plate glass in stores and large panes in high rise buildings. Bricks and plaster cascaded into streets. The Golden State Freeway at the west end of the San Fernando Valley was closed due to cracking.


One man was reported killed when a bridge collapsed over the same freeway near Newhall.
Another was killed when the roof of an ancient brick structure in Los Angeles’ skid row area, the Midnight Mission, fell in.
Another death was at Olive View Sanitarium in the San Fernando Valley where walls collapsed.
At the Olive View Hospital, about 200 persons were evacuated to a parking lot, then to an older building that was undamaged.


The badly damaged building, which was recently decicated, “sank a foot into the ground, and several small buildings collapsed,” KROLL said.


Two persons were reported dead of heart attacks in the wake of the shake.
CIty and county schools were closed so damage could be appraised. So were several downtown buildings. Lockheed Aircraft, hit recently by financial woes, closed two plants pending safety inspection of buildings and cleanup of broken glass.


There were scenes of wild confusion as the quake accompanied by an ominous rumbling sound and violent rolling that lasted nearly a minute, struck as dawn was breaking.


Power lines snapped and transformers showered sparks plunging many areas into darkness. Phone service was knocked out in many areas. Gas mains snapped, with a rash of fires. Water mains parted. Power poles toppled.
Many large apartment buildings were evacuated with residents reported in near panic.
In ensuing hours hospitals in the San Fernando Valley reported receiving scores of injury cases, some walking in, other broght in by helicopter or in emergency vehicles. Corridors and admission desks were jammed. Most valley hospitals suffered at least broken windows and some had wall cracks.


In the San Fernando Valley community of Northridge housewife VIRGINIA WALTERS said she was sitting at the breakfast table “and the whole house began to shake terribly. The water cooler broke and about four gallons went on the kitchen floor.” She said lamps toppled, dishes fell, sidewalks cracked and furniture was flipped over.
Said another housewife: “I was in my kitchen. I fell down and hung onto the sink and started praying.”
Said a resident of a Los Angeles apartment: “I was virtually knocked out of bed. When I got out I could barely walk the floor was rolling so.”


A woman reported residents of her large apartment building were “running around screaming” after the shock.
Motorists driving along commercial streets in Los Angeles, Hollywood and the valley reported sidewalks littered with broken glass. Hospitals reported numerous laceration injuries. Many traffic signals were out for hours.
Damage in communities up and down the coast from Los Angeles was generally light — some broken windows, falling plaster, and items knocked from shelves. In the Simi Valley of Ventura County a wall fell out of an old hotel.
Telephone communications in the San Fernando Valley and to the hard hit communities of Newhall and Saugus. Travel to the latter towns was difficult due to landslides blocked roads and cracked bridges.


Fire destroyed a large drug store in a San Fernando Valley shopping center.
Police patroled damaged structures closely to prevent looting.
Los Angeles first major skyscraper was closed as a result of earthquake damage to its interior and to special structures designed to withstand the effects of earthquakes, a spokesman said.


The 32-story Occidental Tower, completed in the mid-1960s, suffered some sagging floors at the point where two sections of the building were joined by “seismic joints” constructed to provide flexibility under the stress of earthquakes.
Building officer WILLIAM C. GALLOWAY also reported that the first 11 floors of the building, located at 1150 S. Olive, had broken windows and fallen pieces of roof tile. The upper stories and an adjoining 11-story companion building were undamaged. About 5,000 persons work in the two buildings.


Two newer skyscrapers — both 42 stories — reported little or no damage.
The Crocker-Citizens National Bank, at 611 W. 6th St., had a few minor cracks but no other damage, officials said. Its 2,800 employes were at work.


The Union Bank Building, 445 S. Figueroa, reported no visible damage, although elevators were not in service and most of its 2,800 employes went home. Inspectors were checking the buildings elevators for damage.
In Sacramento, officials said the state’s $2.8 billion water project survived with no apparent damage. Tunnels, pipes and canals for the project traverse the area hit, bringing water from the north that makes large populations feasible in once-arid Southern California.

The Fresno Bee And Republican California 1971-02-09

Date February 9, 1971 (1971-02-09)
Magnitude 6.6 Mw
Depth 8.4 kilometers (5.2 mi)
Epicenter                                                                       34°24′58″N 118°22′12″W / 34.416°N 118.37°W / 34.416; -118.37Coordinates:

Click the blue globe to open an interactive map.

34°24′58″N 118°22′12″W / 34.416°N 118.37°W / 34.416; -118.37

Countries or regions USA
(Southern California)
Casualties 65 killed

 

Here are some of my favorite NCAA Football players…

Freshman receiver Aaron Burbridge made two catches for 14 yards in Michigan State’s victory over Central Michigan last weekend. (Al Goldis/Associated Press)

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20120914/SPORTS0202/209140344#ixzz26SWE0UNj

Aaron Burbridge-MSU Spartans #16

Mario Ojemudia #53 Michigan   Wolverines

 

 

 

 

Devin Funchess #19 Michigan Wolverines

Tommy Vento

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Tiger All Stars, Beach Boys, Independence Day

The Detroit News

July 2, 2012

Tigers get three for the All-Star show, maybe two for the Derby

  • By TOM GAGE
  • The Detroit News

St. Petersburg, Fla. — Know what would be better than three Tigers on the American League All-Star team? Two Tigers in the Home Run Derby.

The Tigers never have had two players in the same derby. Not many teams have.

But with Prince Fielder and Miguel Cabrera having been in it before, and obviously qualifying as two of the game’s most feared sluggers, there’s a chance both will participate this year

The derby will be held on July 9 at Kauffman Stadium — the night before the All-Star Game in Kansas City.

Fielder and Cabrera, along with Tigers teammate Justin Verlander, were named American League All-Stars on Sunday.

Outfielder Austin Jackson and relief pitcher Joaquin Benoit were left off the squad — and also aren’t on the fans’ Final Ballot to fill the last spot on the AL All-Star roster.

Some observers, such as Matt Snyder of cbssports.com, are calling Jackson’s omission “a big-time snub.”

Jackson said he wasn’t disappointed at all.

Knowing how difficult it is for setup men to make it, however, Benoit sounded as if he was.

The thought of both Cabrera and Fielder participating in the derby is an intriguing one, to be sure. Fielder has been in it three times, winning the 2009 event as a Milwaukee Brewer at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

Cabrera has been in it twice, including once as a Tiger, but didn’t advance to the finals either time.

Their derby appearances have not coincided. But they hit back-to-back in the Tigers lineup, so Cabrera joked that they’re in a derby “every day.”

“I don’t know if I will,” Cabrera said about participating. “They haven’t asked me yet. It depends on how I feel.”

As for Fielder, it’s not official, but it sounds as if he’ll be a “yes” if asked. For that matter, it sounds as if he’s a “yes” already.

“I don’t know, I think so,” Fielder said at his locker following the Tigers’ 5-3 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays.

When asked if he wants Cabrera in it as well, Fielder said, “yeah.”

When also asked who wins the daily competition Cabrera mentioned, Fielder diplomatically said, “it’s a tie.”

Of switching leagues in the offseason, but still getting voted in as a starter by the fans, Fielder said, “It’s cool. I guess it means I’m nice to the fans.”

Fielder was disappointed as well, but Verlander was the most outspoken of the Tigers about the fact that neither Jackson nor Benoit made it.

“Miguel and Prince will be there every year unless it’s a freak thing,” Verlander said. “Obviously I’m happy for them, but I’m pretty disappointed that Austin and Joaquin don’t have the opportunity to go.

“I think they’re both deserving and it would be a great experience. They got the short end of it.”

Jackson doesn’t look at it that way. In fact, he said he didn’t pay any attention to the advance speculation either way.

“It’s not going to define my year by not making it,” he said. “The way I’m looking at it is that I get the break to let my body recoup and get ready for the second half.”

Instead of being in Kansas City, he’ll be home in Texas.

Benoit, meanwhile, knew his chances of making it were slim, despite the fact manager Jim Leyland spoke earlier in the week on his behalf to the Texas Rangers’ Ron Washington, who’ll manage the AL team.

“I didn’t think about it,” Benoit said. “It’s a long shot for a setup guy and even for some closers, depending on how good the starters are.

“It’s always been starters and closers, and perhaps an extra guy. But look at (Vinnie) Pestano of Cleveland. He’s having a great season, and he’s not even mentioned.”

Benoit said his daughter is “my All-Star.” He’ll spend the break visiting her in the Dominican Republic.

Will he even watch the All-Star Game?

“I don’t know,” he said. “She’s a handful.”

For Cabrera, who made it as a reserve, it’s his seventh time as an All-Star, the third time as a Tiger. His first four were with the Florida (now Miami) Marlins.

“It’s not the same thrill every time,” he said. “It’s always different. I wish I was starting, but I don’t control that. I’ll be happy to be there.”

Verlander is an All-Star for the fifth time. He didn’t pitch in two of the games for which he was selected, though.

“I find it’s a bit different when you have the opportunity to pitch,” he said. “There’s a different intensity to going, living life and just watching.

Verlander is “pretty sure” he’ll be pitching this time. He said Saturday he didn’t expect to be named the AL’s starting pitcher, but would consider it an honor.

“In Kansas City, a division rival,” he said, “I can’t wait to see if I get booed or cheered.”

Fielder, who won the fans’ voting and will start at first base, is representing the Tigers for the first time. But it will be his fourth All-Star Game, with his first three coming when he was a Brewer.

For the combination of Cabrera and Verlander, it’s the third year in a row they’ve both been named All-Stars as Tigers.

There hasn’t been a Tigers tandem with a longer All-Star streak since the mid-1980s — and you might not correctly guess what that twosome was.

If you guessed Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker, you’d be wrong.

If you had guessed Lance Parrish and Whitaker, you’d be right.

Parrish and Whitaker made the same All-Star teams as Tigers from 1983-86 — four years in a row.

The threesome of Parrish, Whitaker and Willie Hernandez made it three years in a row (1984-86)

Perhaps the threesome of Verlander, Cabrera and Fielder will end up challenging that trio.

tom.gage@detnews.com

twitter.com/Tom_Gage

AL starters

Mike Napoli, TEX C
Prince Fielder, DET 1B
Robinson Cano, NYY 2B
Derek Jeter, NYY SS
Adrian Beltre, TEX 3B
Josh Hamilton, TEX OF
Curtis Granderson, NYY OF
Jose Bautista, TOR OF
David Ortiz, BOS DH

July 1, 2012 at 7:02 pm

Cars to celebrate Americana

  • By Larry Printz
  • The Virginian-Pilot

1961 Lincoln Continental (Ford Motor Co.)

This July 4 pre-weekend, let’s step back in time and let our feelings of patriotism well up inside us like overheated radiators.

Put on that Dacron polyester outfit. Pour yourself a martini. Put an Antonio Carlos Jobim album on the record player. That’s it. Relax and enjoy a bit of ’60s American automotive swagger in the best Don Draper fashion.

1961 Lincoln Continental

Price new : $6,067

After years of increasingly garish designs, Lincoln cleaned house. For 1961, Lincoln offered one model: the Continental, in coupe or convertible models. Originally designed as a Ford Thunderbird, its clean, sleek lines remained mostly unchanged through 1967 and it’s considered one of the most influential designs of the 1960s. The 1967 model was the last four-door convertible sold in America.

1963 Buick Riviera

Price new: $4,333

This car was originally designed as a revival of LaSalle, the low-cost Cadillac model built from 1927 through 1940. When Cadillac showed little interest in the proposed car, it went to Buick. The car’s design was inspired by British coach-built cars of the 1950s. Ample power was offered: a 325-horsepower 6.6-liter V-8 was standard, while a 340-horsepower 7.0-liter V-8 was optional and able to reach 60 mph in 7.7 seconds.

1966 Oldsmobile Toronado

Price new : $5,858

This coupe’s dramatic look proclaimed the 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado’s most distinctive feature: It was the first American-built front-wheel-drive car since the 1937 Cord, which influenced its stylists. Measuring 211 inches long and weighing 4,366 pounds, the Toronado needed its 7.0-liter V-8. Underappreciated today, the Toronado impressed critics then; Motor Trend named it Car of the Year.

1967 Cadillac Eldorado:

Price new: $6,903

Cadillac was all about living large, and at 221 inches long, the 1967 Eldorado defined it. The car’s styling was another triumph for GM styling chief Bill Mitchell, as no one could tell that this front-wheel-drive personal luxury coupe used the same platform as the Oldsmobile Toronado. The Eldorado, however, used a different engine. In fact, it used the largest ever placed in a front-wheel-drive car: a 400-horsepower 8.2-liter V-8.

1969 Lincoln Mark III

Price new: $6,585

Ford matched the success of the 1967 Cadillac Eldorado with the 1969 Lincoln Mark III. Introduced in April 1968, the car’s rear tire hump revived a styling idea last seen on the 1956 Mark II. Underneath Mark III’s 6-foot hood was a 375-horsepower, 460-cubic-inch V-8. The new model was popular; almost 31,000 units were sold, 84 percent with a vinyl roof. America’s automotive design aesthetic was turning baroque.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20120701/AUTO03/207010303#ixzz1zTM6n2mx

Beach Boys at Pine Knob…

Band leader Brian Wilson of the rock and roll band “The Beach Boys” poses for a portrait in Los Angeles, CA circa 1967

Beach Boys Kick Off 50th Anniversary Tour in Tucson

42-song set features trademark harmonies, a slew of beach balls

by: Mike Powell

The Beach Boys perform during their 50th Anniversary Tour Opener in Tuscon, Arizona.

Mike Moore/Getty Images

You probably could’ve guessed it was a Beach Boys show just by the shirts the men in the audience wore: Collared, short-sleeved and oversized, with palm trees, hibiscus flowers and nautical gear printed all over them. At the back of the stage, surfboards were lined up like Grecian columns on either side of a huge video screen. It wasn’t until midway through the band’s second set that Mike Love acknowledged what half the people in the audience must’ve been thinking: “It’s, uh, been a little while since we’ve all been on tour together.”

This year, the Beach Boys turn 50. Until the Grammys this past February, Brian Wilson, the band’s troubled heart, hadn’t been on stage with the rest of them since 1996. The tour kickoff last night at the Anselmo Valencia Amphitheater in Tucson was, in that sense, a milestone: not only a marker of their anniversary, but of a public reconciliation between Wilson and the band’s other surviving original members: Al Jardine, Bruce Johnston, David Marks and Wilson’s cousin, Mike Love.

It’s not until a band like the Beach Boys runs through their hits back-to-back in rapid succession that you realize just how many hits they’ve had. Over the course of nearly two and a half hours, they played an astonishing 42 songs, many of them medley-style, with nearly no banter in between. Amid the most familiar stuff – “California Girls,” “Surfin’ Safari,” “Good Vibrations” – were a healthy number of deep cuts and covers, including “Why Do Fools Fall in Love” and Phil Spector’s “Then He Kissed Me,” which Jardine probably wisely rephrased as “Then I Kissed Her.” There were also two uncanny video appearances by Carl and Dennis Wilson, both of whom died years ago. (Dennis “sang” “Forever,” while Carl took on “God Only Knows,” a song Brian wrote for him on 1966’s Pet Sounds.) And about halfway through the second set, something new showed up: A reflective midtempo ballad called “That’s Why God Made the Radio” – a moment that, like so much of the band’s best music, elevated the adolescent to the divine.

Onstage, Mike Love was a low-key kind of showboat, stepping back and forth with the beat, miming the revving of a motorcycle engine on “Little Honda” and hugging his elbows when he sang “and the northern girls with the way they kiss, they keep their boyfriends warm at night” on “California Girls.” Brian seemed placid and stone-faced, sitting at the bench of a large white grand piano. “Ladies and gentlemen, Brian Wilson,” Al Jardine said after “This Whole World,” at which point the crowd rose to their feet in reverence as he sat, blinking. In a sense, Love and Wilson have always been spiritual opposites: Brian wanted to escape to the solace of his bed on “In My Room”; Mike wanted to escape to the solace of tropical beaches on “Kokomo.” They are as strange a pair as they’ve ever been, but it’s their balance – between Brian’s quiet yearning and Mike’s inability to have anything short of a good time – that creates the band’s strange chemistry.

And while this was in some ways a show about Brian Wilson, the Beach Boys are a highly professional enterprise that depend on highly professional people. At any given time there were between six and fifteen hands on stage, including multitaskers on various saxophones and someone to pick up the French horn on “God Only Knows,” the harmonica on “Heroes and Villains” and the theremin for “Good Vibrations.” Oh, and do that singing thing they do, too.

Considering it was the first night of a semi-momentous reunion tour, there wasn’t a whole lot of sentimentality going back and forth, which isn’t to say the band didn’t care about each other, only that they probably cared about the audience more. There were moments, though, between the childhood photographs of the band flashing on the big screen and the brief congratulations they gave each other between songs, that the weight of their history together was felt. At the end of “When I Grow Up (To Be a Man),” Al Jardine looked at the floor, shook his head and laughed. In the 50 years between then and now, they’d grown up.

Throughout the night, a security guard patiently collected beach balls that had traveled through the crowd, stockpiling them behind a large speaker at stage right. By the end of the second set, the pile had reached halfway up the speakers to the jumbo screen, where Brian’s white grand piano lingered on the screen for a second, then disappeared. During the encore he batted them back into the crowd, one by one.

Setlist
“Do It Again”
“Catch A Wave”
“Don’t Back Down”
“Surfin’ Safari”
“Surfer Girl”
“The Little Girl I Once Knew”
“Wendy”
“Then He Kissed Me” (Phil Spector/The Crystals)
“This Whole World”
“Why Do Fools Fall in Love” (Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers)
“When I Grow Up (To Be a Man)”
“You’re So Good to Me”
“In Them Old Cottonfields Back Home”
“Be True to Your School”
“Disney Girls”
“Please Let Me Wonder”
“Don’t Worry Baby”
“Little Honda”
“Little Deuce Coupe”
“409”
“Shut Down”
“I Get Around”
“Sloop John B”
“Wouldn’t It Be Nice”
“Forever”
“Sail On Sailor”
“Heroes and Villains”
“In My Room”
“All This Is That”
“God Only Knows”
“That’s Why God Made the Radio”
“California Dreaming” (The Mamas and the Papas)
“California Girls”
“Dance Dance Dance”
“All Summer Long”
“Help Me Rhonda”
“Rock and Roll Music” (Chuck Berry)
“Barbara Ann”
“Surfin’ U.S.A.”

Encore:
“Kokomo”
“Good Vibrations”
“Fun Fun Fun”

The Who undercover of The Beach Boys…

Barbra Ann

Getcha Back

Please Let Me Wonder

Sail On Sailor

Kiss Me Baby

Forever (featuring lead vocals by Dennis Wilson)

Disney Girls (1957) (featuring lead vocals by Bruce Johnston)

Darlin

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

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“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Possibly the funniest video ever…

The Detroit Tigers Farm Report…

The Detroit News

June 11, 2012

Tigers minor league notebook: Bruce Rondon might be closer of the future

Right-hander Bruce Rondon has 11 saves in 18 appearances at Single A Lakeland this season. (Robin Buckson/Detroit News)

From The Detroit News:

  • By LYNN HENNING
  • / The Detroit News

Tigers observers have noticed this pattern over the years. Their closers tend to close in unconventional ways.

Todd Jones, the man Ernie Harwell dubbed “Roller Coaster” during a white-knuckle appearance in April 2000, stepped to the mound in the ninth inning spanning his two stretches in Detroit, threw strikes, and tended to ignore the one or two runners who might have reached base during his sometimes scary shifts that usually ended in a save.

Jose Valverde has his own style. He’ll mix the occasional 1-2-3 inning with the occasional walk and just as occasional base hit. But he was 49-for-49 in saves a year ago and has 12 saves in 2012. He typically gets the job done — as he did with 1-2-3 finales Saturday and Sunday against the Reds — even if he frightens a few children and adults along the way.

Those same Detroit fans who prefer a good sedative ahead of the ninth dream about the day a Tigers closer arrives with a metaphorical flame-thrower strapped to his jersey. They want opposing batters incinerated, the way so many traditional closers tend to finish ballgames.

And they just might have found their candidate in Single A Lakeland bullpen fire-thrower Bruce Rondon.

Rondon has not allowed an earned run in his last 13 appearances, striking out 18 in 14 1/3 innings. He has walked four during that stretch after Rondon issued free tickets to 34 batters in 40 innings at Single A West Michigan.

“He’s definitely improved on his command,” said Mike Maroth, the former Tigers left-hander who now works as the Flying Tigers’ pitching coach. “Here’s a kid who throws 100 miles an hour and is consistently in the upper 90s. He’s got a live arm and the ball jumps out of his hand.

“But he also throws a slider and a change-up that are pretty good. His slider, at times, has some good bite to it. His change-up he throws 88 to 90, and all I can say is, I wish my fastball had been that good.”

Rondon (pronounced: Ron-DOHN) is 6-foot-3, with weight that is probably under-calculated at 265. It’s generally believed among Lakeland’s expert assessors that he is closer to 285-plus.

But the arm, the mass, and the mechanics have all jelled in 2012. Rondon has an ERA on the season of 2.33, and 0.00 since he began his hot stretch on April 26.

“He knows his role,” Maroth said. “He wants that ball in the ninth inning. When it’s his game, he wants that ball.”

Maroth has appreciated another reliever’s 2012 habits: Tyler Clark, 23, a 6-2, 201-pound right-hander the Tigers snagged in the 24th round of the 2010 draft (University of Missouri).

In his last nine games, Clark has an 0.63 ERA, with nine hits, 18 strikeouts, and seven walks, three of which came in one appearance.

“When you’ve gotten almost halfway through a season and you have an ERA just over 1 (1.23 in 14 games) that, to me, is pretty consistent pitching,” Maroth said. “There’ve been a few times where he’s struggled with his command, but for the most part, he’s done a great job.”

Triple A Toledo

Who’s hot …

Brad Eldred, 1B/DH: Has been a two-month machine for the Mud Hens, leading the league in home runs (22), RBIs (61), and batting .306. Cleared waivers after the Tigers gave him an April-May shot before designating him for assignment.

And who’s not …

Eric Patterson, 2B: . 161 in his last 10 games. Patterson, 29, signed last December as a minor-league free agents.

Double A Erie

Who’s hot …

Jamie Johnson, OF: Owns a 12-game hitting streak, during which he has batted .326. Johnson, 25, is a 5-9, 180-pound, left-handed batter who was a seventh-round pick in 2009 (University of Oklahoma).

And who’s not …

Jared Wesson, LHP: 6.27 ERA in his last 10 starts, with 51 hits and 27 walks in 47 1/3 innings.

Single A Lakeland

Who’s hot …

Dixon Machado, SS: Six-game hitting streak, during which he has batted .426. Machado, 20, is a 6-foot, 169, and a right-handed batter.

Tyler Collins, OF: Last year’s sixth-round pick (Howard College, Texas) is batting .324 spanning his last 10 games. Collins is 22, bats left-handed, and checks in at 5-11, 215.

Luis Castillo, OF: In his last eight games, Castillo, 23, is batting .394, with five doubles and six RBIs. He is 5-11, 160, and bats right-handed.

And who’s not …

Alex Burgos, LHP: Not the season predicted for Burgos, 21, who has a 5.89 ERA in his last 10 starts.

Single A West Michigan

Who’s hot …

Eugenio Suarez, SS: He gets closer by the week to serious big-league projections. Suarez, 20, and 6-foot, 174, is a switch-hitter batting .556 in his last eight games (eight doubles and one triple, included) and .319 on the season.

Curt Casali, C:. 369 in his last 19 games, with two homers, eight doubles, and 16 RBIs. Casali was the Tigers’ 10th-round pick in 2011 (Vanderbilt).

And who’s not …

Aaron Westlake, 1B: Painful first year for the Tigers’ third-round pick in 2011 (Vanderbilt): .154 in his last 10 games and .209 on the season. Westlake, 23, is 6-4, 235, and a left-handed hitter.

Triple A Toledo

Who’s hot …

Brad Eldred, 1B/DH: Has been a two-month machine for the Mud Hens, leading the league in home runs (22), RBIs (61), and batting .306. Cleared waivers after the Tigers gave him an April-May shot before designating him for assignment.

And who’s not …

Eric Patterson, 2B: . 161 in his last 10 games. Patterson, 29, signed last December as a minor-league free agents.

Double A Erie

Who’s hot …

Jamie Johnson, OF: Owns a 12-game hitting streak, during which he has batted .326. Johnson, 25, is a 5-9, 180-pound, left-handed batter who was a seventh-round pick in 2009 (University of Oklahoma).

And who’s not …

Jared Wesson, LHP: 6.27 ERA in his last 10 starts, with 51 hits and 27 walks in 47 1/3 innings.

Single A Lakeland

Who’s hot …

Dixon Machado, SS: Six-game hitting streak, during which he has batted .426. Machado, 20, is a 6-foot, 169, and a right-handed batter.

Tyler Collins, OF: Last year’s sixth-round pick (Howard College, Texas) is batting .324 spanning his last 10 games. Collins is 22, bats left-handed, and checks in at 5-11, 215.

Luis Castillo, OF: In his last eight games, Castillo, 23, is batting .394, with five doubles and six RBIs. He is 5-11, 160, and bats right-handed.

And who’s not …

Alex Burgos, LHP: Not the season predicted for Burgos, 21, who has a 5.89 ERA in his last 10 starts.

Single A West Michigan

Who’s hot …

Eugenio Suarez, SS: He gets closer by the week to serious big-league projections. Suarez, 20, and 6-foot, 174, is a switch-hitter batting .556 in his last eight games (eight doubles and one triple, included) and .319 on the season.

Curt Casali, C:. 369 in his last 19 games, with two homers, eight doubles, and 16 RBIs. Casali was the Tigers’ 10th-round pick in 2011 (Vanderbilt).

And who’s not …

Aaron Westlake, 1B: Painful first year for the Tigers’ third-round pick in 2011 (Vanderbilt): .154 in his last 10 games and .209 on the season. Westlake, 23, is 6-4, 235, and a left-handed hitter.

lynn.henning@detnews.com

 

PARAPROSDOKIANS… (Winston Churchill loved them) are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected; frequently humorous.

1. Where there’s a will, I want to be in it.

2. The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it’s still on my list.

3. Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

4. If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.

5. We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

6. War does not determine who is right – only who is left.

7. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

8. They begin the evening news with ‘Good Evening,’ then proceed to tell you why it isn’t.

9. To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. To steal from many is research.

10. Buses stop in bus stations. Trains stop in train stations. On my desk is a work station.

11. I thought I wanted a career. Turns out I just wanted paychecks.

12. In filling out an application, where it says, ‘In case of emergency, notify:’ I put ‘DOCTOR.’

13. I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

14. Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street with a bald head and a beer gut, and still think they are sexy.

15. Behind every successful man is his woman. Behind the fall of a successful man is usually another woman.

16. A clear conscience is the sign of a fuzzy memory.

17. You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

18. Money can’t buy happiness, but it sure makes misery easier to live with.

19. There’s a fine line between cuddling and holding someone down so they can’t get away.

20. I used to be indecisive. Now I’m not so sure.

21. You’re never too old to learn something stupid.

22. To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.

23. Nostalgia isn’t what it used to be.

24. Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

25. Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.

26. Where there’s a will, there are relatives.

Bond, James Bond

You Only Live Twice