Downtown Detroit Days and 1968

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Gladys Knight & The Pips
I heard it through the grapevine

Aretha …Chain of fools

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Been a while…

Hard to believe that 45 years has passed since the murders of MLK and RFK.

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The summer of 1968 was one of both tragedy & joy (1968 Detroit Tigers)

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The Tigers’ role in healing a city

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The 1968 baseball season occurred in a year of upheaval. The Tet Offensive earlier in the year increased opposition to the Vietnam War. The City of Detroit had suffered through one of the worst riots in American history during the summer of 1967. Less than a week before Opening Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, triggering civil unrest in 60 American cities. The assassination of Robert Kennedy followed in June. And in late August, the Tigers played a series in Chicago, as Chicago police had violent confrontations with thousands of anti-war protesters during the Democratic National Convention. Yet, through the summer of 1968, the people of Detroit were united by their passion for the Tigers and the calming radio voice of Tigers broadcaster, Ernie Harwell. When the Tigers won the World Series, the headline in the Detroit Free Press read: “WE WIN!” The headline told the story. Amidst all the turmoil, the people of Detroit came together behind their baseball team.

 

                       

Tigers Win the Series

In a column published on October 11, 1968, Detroit’s senior baseball writer, Joe Falls, described the impact of the Tigers championship on the city.

My
town, as you know, had the worst riot in our nation’s history in the summer of
1967, and it left scars which may never fully heal. . . . And so, as 1968
dawned and we all started thinking ahead to the hot summer nights in Detroit,
the mood of our city was taut. It was apprehensive. . . . But then something
started happening in the middle of 1968. You could pull up to a light at the
corner of Clairmount and 12th, which was the hub of last year’s riot, and the
guy in the next car would have his radio turned up: ‘ …. McLain looks in for
the sign, he’s set — here’s the pitch’ … It was a year when an entire
community, an entire city, was caught up in a wild, wonderful frenzy.

Even the Governor of Michigan, George Romney, credited the Tigers with helping calm the city. In a letter to owner John Fetzer, Romney wrote: “The deepest meaning of this victory extends beyond the sports pages, radio broadcasts, and the telecasts that have consumed our attention for several months. This championship occurred when all of us in Detroit and Michigan needed a great lift. At a time of unusual tensions, when many good men lost their perspective toward others, the Tigers set an example of what human relations should really be.”[

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Otis Redding

Mason Williams

Joes Feliciano Summer 1968

Jose Feliciano at World Series of 1968

Herb Alpert

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Some very cool cars from Chrysler Corporation

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1964 Dodge Charger

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1964 Plymouth Belvedere

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1964 Dodge 330

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1951 Saratoga Club Coupe

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1970 Plymouth Barracuda

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1968 Dodge Hemi Charger

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1955 Dodge LaFemme

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1968 Dodge Dart

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1970 Plymouth Hemi Cuda

Ads from the old days
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Retro TV commercials

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Early Motown Legend Mary Wells

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Noted author Peter Benjaminson has written a new book about Mary.

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Read more here

Mary Esther Wells
(1943-1992)

Motown diva Mary Wells was more than just one of Motown’s most sultriest vocalists, she was also the label’s first real star to emerge from the label. A star that dimmed prematurely after Wells left during the success of “My Guy”, the song now a signature staple for Wells and sixties music in general. However, she kept on with her career before illness stilled her beautiful voice.

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Born into humble beginnings in Detroit on May 13, 1943, Wells was one of three children born to a single mother who worked odds and ends to keep her struggling family fed. At the age of two, young Mary contracted spinal meningitis and struggled to overcome near blindness, deafness and near-paralysis, all of which she overcame as the illness failed to end her life. By the time she was in her teens, Mary was already performing in nightclubs and talent showcases when in 1960, she felt confident to reach Motown president Berry Gordy and presented him with a song she said she’d written for R&B legend Jackie Wilson. However upon hearing the song, Gordy figured Wells could release it. In late 1960, “Bye Bye Baby” was released and quickly shot Wells to local stardom becoming an R&B hit. After another hit (“I Don’t Want to Take a Chance”) and an uncharted third single, Wells teamed up with Miracles front man Smokey Robinson to create a mixture of pop-soul that would define Motown Records in the years to come.

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In 1962, the duo collaborated on the single, “The One Who Really Loves You”. The song shot to the top ten of the pop charts and quickly spawned two follow-ups, “You Beat Me to the Punch” (which was Motown’s first Grammy nomination in the best Rhythm & Blues Recording category) and the #1 hit “Two Lovers”, the latter single sending Wells to pop stardom. The 19-year-old Wells’ vocals, championed by Robinson, showcased a deep sense of serenity and sultriness that made her one of Motown’s first prominent figures. Throughout 1963, Wells’ fame grew due to touring as a headliner on the Motortown Revue performances and to recordings such as “Laughing Boy”, “What’s So Easy for Two Is So Hard for One” and “You Lost the Sweetest Boy”, the latter composed for Wells by the team of Holland-Dozier-Holland. Wells also cut a live album and a series of duets with Marvin Gaye later issued as Together. That same year, an album that was to be released was shelved for unknown reasons but was later issued as the album, Vintage Stock.

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In 1964, Motown issued the blockbuster hit, “My Guy”, which rose up to number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 becoming just the third number-one hit by a Motown artist and the first number-one under the Motown subsidiary. The song also took charge in England where it peaked at number-five. Wells’ success had briefly eclipsed that of the Beatles, who would later hail Wells as “their favorite American female singer”. The same time “My Guy” became running to the top of the charts, Motown put out Wells’ and Marvin Gaye’s first duet album, Together. Featuring the double-sided hits “Once Upon a Time” and “What’s the Matter with You Baby”, the album peaked at the top fifty and became Marvin Gaye’s first charted album as wells as one of Wells’ last to chart this high – her highest-charted album was to come (Mary Wells Sings My Guy peaked at number six on the strength of “My Guy”). However, despite this incredible year of accomplishments, Wells was restless. She was tired of what she says of being mistreated and mismanaged with no royalties coming in for her. She argued to Motown president Berry Gordy over the direction of her career and felt, with her ex-husband Herman Griffin’s request, that she should leave the label that had built her into a star. Despite counter-suing lawsuits between Wells and Motown, the singer’s argument that she had signed with the label when she was underage gave judges the right to rule in favor of Wells leaving Motown. The label gave her a stiff settlement and agreed to let her go. At the age of 21, Wells left Motown and signed with 20th Century Fox. Just a few weeks later, “My Guy” hit #1.

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Later in 1964, Wells agreed on an offer to join the Beatles on a UK tour with Wells as its opening act further establishing their point of the singer being their favorite “American sweetheart”. Wells was a hit in England and to celebrate one of her biggest accomplishments, she recorded the tribute album, Love Songs to the Beatles, one of two albums Wells recorded for 20th Century Fox Records. The first album, 1965′s self-titled Mary Wells included the successive hit singles “Ain’t It the Truth” (#45 pop), “Stop Taking Me for Granted” (#88 pop), “Use Your Head” (#34 pop, #13 R&B) and “Never, Never Leave Me” (#54 pop, #15 R&B). Despite her singles’ success, Wells’ albums began to falter on the charts after her release from Motown. Despite offers to receive a movie contract in earnest of her ambitious new deal with her company, the film deal proved to be a bust. To make matters worse, in 1965, the 22-year-old singer failed ill to tuberculosis canceling a string of engagements and events only making things worse for her after leaving Motown. After recovering, Wells decided to leave 20th Century Fox eventually settling with Atco Records, a subsidiary of R&B powerhouse label Atlantic Records.

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In early 1966, Wells released the album, The Two Sides of Mary Wells, and released what became her final top ten R&B hit with “Dear Lover” (#6 R&B, #51 pop). However, despite that success, Wells struggled with other singles and her tenure with Atco was much less successful than her 20th Century Fox tenure. In 1967, Wells left Atco for Jubilee Records. That same year, the star married her second husband, musician Cecil Womack. It would be Womack, the brother of famed R&B star Bobby Womack, that convinced Wells to establish more control in her career and for the first time since she first auditioned for Berry Gordy, she was writing her own songs. One of them, “The Doctor”, would become a modest hit reaching #65 pop and #22 R&B in 1968. The parent album, Servin’ Up Some Soul, showed a grittier and earthier element in Wells’ music that hadn’t been there in a while since she teamed up with Smokey Robinson. However, like her other deals, her tenure with Jubilee was complicated and short-lived. By 1970, struggling with her declining career and becoming the mother of three, Wells abruptly retired from performing and left Jubilee Records.

Between 1971 and 1974, Wells would record some singles for Reprise Records, which included productions from Wells’ brother-in-law Bobby. Family matters would get complicated in 1977 when after divorcing Cecil after 10 years of marriage, she wounded up carrying Cecil and Bobby’s brother Curtis’ baby, her fourth. She also adopted three other children from late brother-in-law Harry Womack’s children giving her a total of seven children to raise. Dealing with struggles, Wells tried to keep it together. Smoking two packs a day of Menthol cigarettes and dealing with troubling affairs, Wells had had enough. In 1980, she separated from the Womack family completely and began raising her children as a single mother. That year, she finally convinced herself to end her retirement from performing. After signing a deal with CBS/Epic Records in 1981, she was convinced to make a comeback to the music scene that had drastically changed since Wells’ last studio album over thirteen years ago.

Recording songs by Greg Perry and the talented Mizell brothers Larry and Fonce, Wells recorded a mixture of funk jams and R&B ballads and titled it In and Out of Love. Released in the fall of 1981, the album yielded the dance-floor classic, “Gigolo”. With a feverish funk production, high-octane vocals by Wells (she even recorded two rap verses!), the song eventually hit #2 on Billboard’s disco chart. Its success eventually landed Wells on her first TV appearance in years performing on Soul Train in 1982. With the increasing rise of Motown nostalgia, Wells was convinced to return fully to performing and began recording two cover albums that would be released in 1982 and 1983, the latter album including four new tracks had a new-wave approach to them. In 1983, Wells reunited with Motown Records during the label’s 25th anniversary special. Recording several singles and one more album in 1990 for Motorcity Records, Wells kept up a frenetic performing schedule. However in 1990, the 47-year-old was stunned when during a routine check in the hospital, doctors discovered that she had cancer in the larynx. After immediately going into treatment, Wells’ finances, already a problem because of Wells’ declining success, was completely wiped out by her illness. Treatment on her cancer led to her voice being reduced to a whisper forcing her into a retirement 30 years after her career started in Motown. Wells, always the survivor, talked about her battle with cancer and opened up to the houses of Congress to find cure in cancer treatment. In 1990 and 1991, tributes were given out to Wells and money donations came from fans such as Bruce Springsteen and Natalie Cole to old friends such as Dionne Warwick and Diana Ross. However, by spring 1992, the cancer returned and she was diagnosed also with pneumonia. The 49-year-old struggled to survive in her hospital bed but relapsed into a coma.

On July 26, 1992, the strain of Wells’ cancer and a weakened immune system finally forced her heart to give out. And a voice that was one of the most beautiful to emerge out of the sixties was stilled forever. Mary Esther Wells died of pneumonia and cancer-related complications at the tender age of just forty-nine. Her death stunned the Motown family putting an end to an early era of the classic sounds of the label. Despite her difficulties after leaving Motown, Wells managed to handle everything with a smile. She never complained and always was humble even in success. For music listeners who love Motown and grew up in the sixties, Wells’ soothing voice fit the soundtrack of people’s lives and more than fifteen years later, they’re still proclaiming Wells to be “their girl”.

Mary with Marvin Gaye

Mary

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

RIP Alex Karras

Where do you begin?

Clowning with Dick the Bruiser

Mongo

All American DT at Iowa-2nd in Heisman Trophy vote to John David Crow in 1957

Outland Trophy Winner-1957

Lead Iowa to their 1st Rose Bowl

College Football HOF-1991

Detroit Lion All Pro—12 year career

Alex Karras on MNF 1976

Schlitz Malt Liquor

On Match Game

Faygo

MONGO!!!

Drafted out of Iowa in 1958, the defensive tackle was listed at 6-feet-2 and 248 pounds, small by today’s standards (Ndamukong Suh is 6-4, 307) – and he wore glasses.

• First- or second-team all-pro every year during the 1960s, except for one.

• 1963: Suspended, along with Green Bay running back Paul Hornung, for one season for gambling on NFL games. (Hornung elected to Hall of Fame in 1986; Karras hasn’t been.)

• Missed one game in 12 pro seasons, ending in 1970.

• Lost his last Lions game by the oddest of scores, 5-0, to Dallas in the first round of the ’70 playoffs.

• Reported to training camp in 1971 but was released by his old pal and then-Lions coach Joe Schmidt; playing career over at age 35

• Took up professional wrestling before he signed with the Lions and returned to it when suspended for the 1963 season. Memorable bouts included ones with Dick the Bruiser.

• Part owner of the Lindell AC , a sports bar in downtown Detroit.—MUST READ this NYT article…

October 8, 2012

Amid Newfound Glory, Echoes of Old Detroit

By BILL MORRIS

For more than a century, the city of Detroit has been driven by a pair of powerful but erratic engines: cars and sports. Detroiters are no strangers to the sorrows these engines can bring: layoffs, factory shutdowns, losing streaks, even winless seasons. Yet, many Detroiters are feeling giddy these days. The auto industry has come roaring back from the brink of ruin, and the Tigers are back in the playoffs for the second straight year — routine stuff in the Bronx, perhaps, but something that hasn’t happened in the Motor City since the 1930s.

To top it off, the star of this year’s Tigers is a slugger named Miguel Cabrera, who led the American League in home runs, batting average and runs batted in, a trifecta last accomplished nearly half a century ago by Carl Yastrzemski of the Boston Red Sox, and by only a handful of others in the history of the game.

The team plays in a sparkling downtown park that was built a dozen years ago and named, to the dismay of many purists, after a bank. More than three million fans have passed through its turnstiles so far this year, and it’s a safe bet that many of them don’t remember or have managed to forget the team’s previous home, a great sooty iceberg built in 1912 just west of downtown. Tiger Stadium is gone to dust now, memories of it growing dimmer every time Cabrera whacks another ball over the outfield wall at Comerica Park.

But Detroiters tend to have a deep, quirky sense of pride, and more than a few of them will tell you that there’s a bygone relic even more worthy of mourning than Tiger Stadium. Or the downtown J. L. Hudson department store. Or Cass Tech High School, whose alumni roster includes John DeLorean, Lily Tomlin and Diana Ross.

That other place was a bar called the Lindell A.C. It was in an unexceptional-looking brick building a few blocks from Tiger Stadium, but it became a legend, a place where the famous rubbed elbows with the unknown.

It was first opened in 1949 in the no-star Lindell Hotel by Meleti Butsicaris. In the 1950s, a regular customer suggested putting signed photographs of athletes on the walls. He even showed Butsicaris and his sons, Johnny and Jimmy, how to cut a baseball bat in half lengthwise, the better to screw it into the wall. Soon other bats and baseballs, hockey sticks and pucks were added, along with the jerseys of local gods like Al Kaline, Norm Cash, Gordie Howe and Dave Bing, a Pistons star who is now the mayor of Detroit. But the maraschino cherry on the memorabilia was surely Lions linebacker Wayne Walker’s jockstrap, which was fastened to a plaque in a prominent place on the barnacled walls. The customer who came up with the original suggestion about hanging the signed photographs was a Yankees infielder named Billy Martin.

After relocating to the corner of Michigan and Cass Avenues in 1963, the Butsicaris family added “A.C.” to the name at the suggestion of a local sports columnist and repeat customer named Doc Greene — a wry swipe at the swells who patronized the nearby Detroit Athletic Club. The Lindell A.C.’s burgers were out of this world, there were three television sets, and the place was always jumping. Jimmy Butsicaris installed himself at the corner of the bar every night, where he could keep one eye on the door and one on the cash register. “He didn’t want to have any seepage,” the owner of a nearby bar says. “And he wanted to know everybody who walked in that door — cop or robber, friend or foe.” For foes, Jimmy kept a set of brass knuckles in his pocket.

In 1963, Pete Rozelle, the commissioner of the N.F.L., suspended Paul Hornung, the golden boy of the Green Bay Packers, and Lions defensive lineman Alex Karras for gambling on games in the Lindell A.C. Rozelle also ordered Karras to divest himself of his one-third interest in the saloon. Hornung was contrite; Karras was outraged. The scandal was excellent for the Butsicarises’s business.

To work out his anger, Karras took up professional wrestling during his suspension. One night, he and a future opponent, Dick the Bruiser, went at each other inside the Lindell A.C., an epic brawl that left the place — and Karras — in tatters.

Six years later, Martin, then manager of the Minnesota Twins, got into a dispute inside the Lindell A.C. with one of his own pitchers, burly Dave Boswell, a 20-game winner that year. Though Martin was giving away several inches and many more pounds, they took their differences into the alley behind the bar. When it was over, Boswell’s face required 20 stitches while Martin’s needed just seven. Apparently impressed by Martin’s way of handling his pitching staff, the Tigers hired him two years later, and he led the team to the division title in 1972.

But perhaps the thing that truly set the Lindell A.C. apart — and the thing that reveals just how different its world was from the world we live in today — was the way professional athletes and other celebrities, from Mickey Mantle to Milton Berle to Andre the Giant, mingled with ordinary fans.

Terry Foster had a ringside seat for this cultural shift. His mother, Roxanne, worked at the Lindell A.C. for 20 years, and Foster, now 53, worked there as a cook while attending Cass Tech, then tended bar during college. “I remember going in after a Tigers game and seeing Willie Horton, Earl Wilson and Gates Brown sitting next to fans, having a beer and a burger, just talking to the fans,” says Foster, who writes a sports column for The Detroit News and hosts a radio sports show. “It was almost like they’d just gotten off the third shift at G.M. Players from all the visiting teams came into the Lindell A.C., and there wasn’t all this fawning. They were one of the fellas. Today, I see athletes at parties, and they’re roped off in their private area with their ladies. That doesn’t do it for me.”

The ballplayers back then, of course, often had little choice. Most of them had to work jobs during the off-season because they weren’t multimillionaires who breathed their own ether, safely shielded from hoi polloi. It was a time of greater intimacy, rougher edges and, yes, more excess. It was also more colorful, more vivid, in many ways more alive than our high-dollar, heart-smart, smoke-free, sanitized times.

Vaughn Derderian Sr., who runs the Anchor Bar in downtown Detroit, agrees with Foster. “The players don’t hang out anymore,” says Derderian, 65, whose family has been in the bar business since the 1920s. “The reason is because they’re a little smarter — and they’re making a whole lot more money. They don’t want to get hassled by the fans. The Lindell A.C. was one of the last places where that contact happened.”

It had stopped happening by the time the bar closed for good in 2002. Four years later, the building was demolished to make way for a bus station.

“To call it legendary is an understatement,” Derderian adds. “It was the first sports bar in the country. Now there’s one on every corner.”

There’s a big one on the corner of Woodward Avenue and Montcalm Street, across the street from Comerica Park. It’s called the Hockeytown Cafe. It has 45 TVs, including 30 63-inch plasma sets, and its walls are plastered with sports memorabilia.

There are only three things missing. Actual athletes mingling with the customers. A tough little Greek guy sitting at the corner of the bar with a set of brass knuckles in his pocket. And Wayne Walker’s jockstrap high on the wall.

Bill Morris grew up in Detroit in the 1950s and ’60s. He is the author of the novels “Motor City” and “All Souls’ Day,” and has finished another, “Vic #43,” set during the 1967 Detroit riot and the Tigers’ 1968 championship season.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: October 10, 2012

Because of an editing error, a picture credit with an article on Tuesday about Lindell A.C., a famous bar near Tigers Stadium in Detroit that closed in 2002, misidentified the photographer. The picture of memorabilia on the wall of the bar was taken by John T. Greilick of The Detroit News, not J. Kyle Keener of The Detroit Free Press.

 

• In 1968, he and teammates played themselves in “Paper Lion,” the movie version of George Plimpton’s book in which Plimpton tried out with the Lions.

• Starting in 1970, displayed a dry sense of humor and gained notoriety during repeat appearances on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.”

• Played Mongo in Mel Brooks’ “Blazing Saddles” in 1974.

• Color commentator on “Monday Night Football,” 1974-76.

• Played George Zaharias opposite Susan Clark in the TV movie “Babe” (1975), the story of Babe Didrickson.

• Karras and Clark married in 1980.

• Starred in the TV sitcom “Webster” with Clark and Emmanuel Lewis, 1983-89.

• Hosted “Saturday Night Live” in 1985.

• Returned to Detroit in 2003 for the 40th anniversary of the publication of “Paper Lion,” appearing with, among others, Plimpton, Schmidt, Lem Barney, Ron Kramer, Mike Lucci and Earl Morrall. But the loudest cheers at Ford Field were for the famed Fearsome Foursome defensive line of Karras, Roger Brown, Darris McCord and Sam Williams.

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

70’s Soul Tuesday

And some cool K-Mart photos

The Three Degrees
When will I see you again?

Hues Corporation
Rock the boat

George McCrae
Rock your baby

Gwen McCrae (married to George)
Rockin Chair

Bobby Womack
I’m lookin for a love

Ben E. King
Your love (is a supernatural thing)

LTD (featuring the Great Jeffrey Osborne)
Love Ballad

Isley Brothers
Footsteps in the dark

Bootsy Collins
I’d rather be with you

New Birth
Wildflower

1st Kmart store in Garden City

Jaclyn Smith

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Detroit Riot started 45 years ago

Remembering the Detroit Riot of 1967

One of the most profound events in Michigan’s history is the Detroit Riot of 1967. Wikipedia’s 12th Street Riot entry explains:

The 12th Street Riot was a civil disturbance in Detroit that began in the early morning hours of Sunday, July 23, 1967. Vice squad officers executed a raid at a blind pig, or speakeasy, on the corner of 12th Street and Clairmount on the city’s near westside. The confrontation with the patrons there evolved into one of the deadliest and most destructive riots in modern U.S. history, lasting five days and far surpassing the 1943 riot the city endured. Before the end, the state and federal governments, under order of then President Lyndon B. Johnson, sent in National Guard and U.S. Army troops. The result was forty-three dead, 467 injured, over 7,200 arrests and more than 2,000 buildings burned down.

The Detroit Police broke up a party at a “Blind Pig” upstairs at this building on July 23rd 1967.

Inner City Blues-Marvin Gaye


John Conyers attempting to calm the crowd at 12th and Clairmount

Willie Horton remembers the riots…

Donny Hathaway
The Ghetto

This link is a great resource


Chaos: Police and firemen attempt to get blazing fires under control

Panic in Detroit

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Palmer Park

This is really cool! I used to go to this place when I was very young.

 June 22, 2012

Palmer’s Log Cabin welcomes visitors

  • By The Detroit News
    • Thomas W. Palmer has come to be considered one of the most significant figures in Detroit history, and he considered his celebrated log cabin to be “more beautiful than any castle in Spain.”
    • More than 125 years ago, he and his wife Lizzie hired the firm of George Mason and Zachariah Rice, designers of Detroit’s Masonic Temple, to design and build a log cabin at his farm. At the time, it was a knoll near Woodward Avenue overlooking a small pond fed by one of the many natural springs in the area. The cabin, its rustic log bridge, a lighthouse, and a larger pond named Lake Frances after Palmer’s wife’s mother, were completed in 1885, the year that Mason and Rice hired Albert Kahn as a new apprentice. The lake, log cabin and lighthouse still stand today, but the cabin has been closed for some 30 years, is rapidly deteriorating and must be restored.
    • The log cabin was constructed with logs from the farm and was filled with antiques and collectibles, mostly from the Palmer family farm in Connecticut. Senator Palmer enjoyed taking dignitaries and politicians to the farm by horse cart from downtown Detroit for picnics and fireworks displays. All his events were open to the public.

The Palmer Park cabin, Detroit (Ricardo Thomas / The Detroit News)

After more than a decade, the public is invited to tour Palmer’s Log Cabin, located in Palmer Park and built in 1885 as a summer home for Sen. Thomas Palmer and his wife, Lizzie Merrill Palmer.

The Sunday event is part of Michigan’s 26th Log Cabin Day and will include live music, square dancing, children’s activities and an old-fashioned ice-cream social at 2 p.m. The ice cream has been donated by Guernsey Farms Dairy in Northville.

Guided tours are set for 1-4 p.m. Donations will be accepted for People for Palmer Park, a nonprofit organization.

The cabin is in a corner of Palmer Park, off Merrill Plaissance near Woodward and McNichols in Detroit.

For information, visit http://peopleforpalmerpark.org/2012/0605/log-cabin-day/.

Bob Dylan & Johnny Cash…The Girl from the North Country

Bob Dylan’s epic Hurricane…
The story of Middle weight boxer Ruben “Hurricane” Carter

Neil Young
You are like a hurricane

Going into the Deep Tracks…
Beach Boys Funky Pretty

Sail On Sailor

That’s why God made the radio

Darlin

Elton John…Grimsby a great track form the Caribou LP

It’s hard to believe that this amazing album from my youth was released 39 years ago this week…

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”

Good Humor Man under duress and some Great Clapton from 461 Ocean Boulevard

One of the best memories many of us share from our youth is “The Ice Cream Man”

As kids when we heard the sound blocks away we would go into a frenzy seeking money to get a treat.

There were many different types of ice cream trucks but The Good Humor man was the best one!

Ice cream truck drivers lose humor with scarce icy treats

By Rene Wisely

Special to The Detroit News

Justin Stokes buys ice cream from Lynn Rubicz. Rubicz is falling $100 short on her typical daily haul of $300 when school is still in session. (David Guralnick / The Detroit News)

As he heads into the height of ice cream buying season, the mood of Daisy Ice Cream Co. owner Keith Bartholomew should reflect the brand name on his fleet of 18 ice cream trucks: Good Humor.

But a nationwide shortage of Good Humor’s cool treats has taken much of the fun out of his business.

“Do you know how bad you feel when you make a 5-year-old cry by telling them we’re out of SpongeBob?” asked Bartholomew, a 25-year industry veteran based in Madison Heights, referring to the square-shaped, yellow and red ice cream bar based on the cartoon character. “I’ve never seen a shortage like this ever before.”

Good Humor’s shortage is limited to mobile vending units. Toasted Almond and Chocolate Éclair lovers can still find their delights in a grocery freezer case, but the bigger bars made specifically for the ice cream trucks may return in July, said Jeff Graubard, spokesman for Unilever PLC, the London-based conglomerate that owns Good Humor, the Popsicle brand, Ben & Jerry’sand Breyers.

The problem was created by the nation’s early hot spring, which caused an unexpected, higher-than-usual demand for ice cream, just as Unilever was closing its Maryland Good Humor factory and shifting production to other plants, Graubard said.

The shortage also has meant that Daisy has been out of Snow Cones, Screw Balls, King Cones and Candy Center Crunches for weeks, Bartholomew said.

His business is down at least 20 percent — even during his peak season and with an extra two months of sales because of the warm spring temperatures.

“I’m struggling,” he said.

Two of his drivers have quit because they grew tired of saying no to customers, Bartholomew said.

Even Lynn Rubicz, a Daisy subcontractor and one of its top five sellers, is falling $100 short on her typical daily haul of $300 when school is still in session. Most items are priced $1 to $3.

Rubicz combs the tony neighborhoods of Shelby and Washington townships in search of Good Humor fans.

“People are walking away from the trucks without getting anything because their favorites aren’t there,” said Rubicz, an ice cream truck driver of 10 years. “I normally make enough in the summer to last all year, but I don’t know if I will this year.”

Carl Post, who drives his 1969 restored Good Humor truck near Holland, is considering leaving the business. He put his truck up for sale on eBay after running into roadblocks to get inventory.

No one feels the hurt more than David Sadeghi, president of Pars Ice Cream in Detroit. He has the exclusive “master distributor” contract to supply every Metro Detroit ice cream truck driver, distributor and retailer with a free-standing freezer chest. Any time they run out of a product, he gets a phone call and, lately because of the shortage, an earful.

“This is doing substantial harm to my business,” he said. “The ice cream season is too short for this. Every day I lose money.”

It may have long-term implications, too, said Bonnie Knutson, a Michigan State University professor and expert on consumer buying trends.

“If you get consumers out of the habit of buying the ice cream from the truck, it’s going to take a major push to bring them back to make this impulse buy when they can just as easily go to their freezer and eat it at their convenience,” Knutson said.

Or they might buy their treats at the local ice cream stand, she said.

“Memories are what people like here,” said Paul Walter, owner of Dairy Deluxe, a soft serve stand in Birmingham. “Time is precious, and they want to create memories with their family, so they come here for an outing.”

Mobile competitors like Captain Kool Ice Cream in Center Line and Meadowbrook Ice Cream Co. in Rochester Hills, which sell Wells’ Blue Bunny and other premium brands, hope the charm of music trucks and the nostalgia they bring keep families running out, waving their dollar bills.

Neither company has benefited from the Good Humor shortage, saying they haven’t noticed an uptick in their mobile business. To capitalize on the shortage, the competitors would have to find a Good Humor route, buy a permit from their new community and budget time to drive a new area without neglecting established customers.

But Captain Kool Ice Cream and Meadowbrook Ice Cream expect to win over customers needing to rent their trucks for special events such as graduation parties and company picnics.

“We’re not out of any flavors like Good Humor is,” said Captain Kool manager Sean Hyland. “Once you taste our product, you’ll love it because the first ingredient listed on Blue Bunny products is milk, and that makes a huge difference in flavor. Not all Good Humors say that anymore.”

Hyland longs for the days of the easier sell — before more novelty ice cream was sold in grocery stores and when the economy was better.

“It’s hard to be in the ice cream truck business these days with gas prices so high,” he said. His company owned 25 trucks before the economy dipped and is now down to 18.

“We only took about three applications to drive trucks for this season, and it’s normally 20 to 30,” Hyland said.

Even without a shortage, business is melting.

Good Humor

Founded: 1920
Origins: Youngstown, Ohio, candy maker Harry Burt covered ice cream with a smooth chocolate coating and froze it on a stick. He called them “Good Humor Bars,” tapping into the then-prevailing belief that people’s temperament or “humor” affected their sense of taste. Three years later, Burt got the patent rights to ice cream on a stick. He used a fleet of 12 chauffeur-driven trucks with employees in white uniforms.
Expansion: After Burt died, wife Cora Burt took the company public and sold franchises. It expanded into the Midwest and beyond.
Delivery shift: In 1976, Good Humor sold its fleet of trucks so it could concentrate on selling in grocery stores. It still distributed the ice cream to independent street vendors.

From The Detroit News:

Van Halen

HERE IS MORE IGOR…

THIS GUY IS A 100 ON THE UNINTENTIONAL COMEDY SCALE…

 He said his Mom bought him pants 10 sizes too large!

Clapton from 461 Ocean Boulevard…

A&M COLLISION

TOTAL PERFORMANCE

Remember to check out Total Performance for all of your training needs. Jim Kielbaso is highly experienced, an excellent motivator and has tremendous knowledge. He can do it all from offseason football workouts to injury rehab to personal running mechanics. Jim can be reached at Total Performance Training Center in Wixom at 248-669-9818.

BELLA VITA

When anywhere near 12 Mile and Middlebelt…stop at Bella Vita for delicious pizza, chicken, subs and more. It is a locally owned business and the owners are friendly and on-site. There is a nice wine shoppe next door…Bella Vino for all of your party needs. It is located next to Jeans Hardware directly across 12 Mile from Farmington Hills Harrison High School. Stop in before or after a game or on your way to a picnic!!

www.bellavinofinewine.com

Don’t forget to subscribe in the top right. Have a great day and thanks again for reading!

Coach Billy Slobin NMLS# 131197

Capital Mortgage Funding

a division of United Shore Financial Services, LLC NMLS # 3038

Senior Vice President

Toll free-(800)-low-rate

Local-(248)-569-7283

Fax-(248)-232-1529

17170 West Twelve Mile Road

Southfield MI 48076

wbslobin@lowrateonline.com

A Referral is the ultimate compliment!

Please feel free to refer your friends & family to me.
All referrals are greatly appreciated!

“The only discipline that lasts is self discipline”